< html > The Associated Press
Bolivar Commercial
 LATEST NEWS
 Top Stories
 U.S.
  Severe Weather
  Bird Flu
 World
  Castro
  Mideast Crisis
  Iraq
 Business
 Personal Finance
 Technology
 Sports
  Sports Columns
  NASCAR
  Baseball
  College Hoops
  NBA
  NHL
  Tennis
  Golf
 Entertainment
 Health
 Science
 Politics
 Washington
 Offbeat
 Podcasts
 Blogs
 Weather
 Raw News
 NEWS SEARCH
 
 Archive Search
 SPECIAL SECTIONS
 Multimedia Gallery
 AP Video Network
 Today
 in History
 Corrections
Jul 22, 8:59 PM EDT

Crews make gains on massive Washington wildfire

AP Photo
AP Photo/JESSE TINSLEY
US Video

Buy AP Photo Reprints
PHOTO GALLERY
AP Photo

Wildfires

Multimedia
Wildfires threaten Calif. homes
Real-time wildfire tracker.
Wildfires Consume L.A. Homes
Pasadena Wildfire Forces More Evacuations
Wildfire Mentors Aid Victims
Headlines
Obama attributes wildfires to climate change

Review: Amazon Fire offers new ways to use phones

Crews make gains on massive Washington wildfire

Cause of fire at Williston company unknown

Maryland church built in 1773 ravaged by fire

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) -- Firefighters were making progress Tuesday in their efforts to get the largest wildfire in Washington state's history under control, with wetter weather bringing some relief but also raising concerns about flash flooding.

The Carlton Complex of fires, which has burned nearly 400 square miles in the north-central part of the state, was 16 percent contained as of Tuesday, fire spokeswoman Jessica Payne said. A day earlier, the fire was just 2 percent contained.

Firefighters and local authorities have been heartened by forecasts that call for cooler temperatures and higher humidity. But even though wetter weather has moved in, they worry that lightning strikes could ignite more fires.

Rain also brings worries about the potential for flash flooding because so much ground vegetation has been burned away.

The National Weather Service issued a flood watch from Wednesday morning through Wednesday evening due to expected heavy rainfall.

"It takes as little as 10 minutes of heavy rain to cause flash flooding and debris flows in and below areas affected by wildfires," the advisory says. "Rain runs off almost instantly from burned soils ... causing creeks and drainages to flood at a much faster rate than normal."

At more than 250,000 acres, the Carlton Complex is larger than the 1902 Yacolt Burn, which consumed 238,920 acres in southwestern Washington and was the state's largest recorded forest fire, according to HistoryLink.org, an online resource of Washington state history.

The fire is being blamed for one death. Rob Koczewski, 67, died of an apparent heart attack Saturday while he and his wife were hauling water and digging fire lines near their home. Koczewski was a retired Washington State Patrol trooper and U.S. Marine.

The number of homes destroyed in the Carlton Complex fire remained at 150, Payne said. Two structures, an outbuilding and a seasonal cabin, were confirmed destroyed Tuesday in the Chiwaukum Creek Fire near Leavenworth, she said.

More than 2,100 firefighters and support crew are involved with fighting the fire, Payne said. She said firefighters have had success with fire lines on the east side of state Highway 153 between Carlton and Twisp, and they would be burning lines around Pearrygin Lake on Tuesday.

"If that's successful, it will mitigate some of the risk to the homes in the area," she said.

Karina Shagren, spokeswoman for the state's Military Department, said that while the National Guard has already been offering aerial support, 100 National Guard troops were now being used on the ground for firefighting, and additional troops were receiving firefighting training for potential future use.

President Barack Obama arrived in the state for a fundraiser Tuesday, and Gov. Jay Inslee met with him in the afternoon to provide a briefing on the fires.

Inslee said he asked Obama for an emergency declaration that could provide access to resources like generators for communities without power. The declaration could also provide assistance for debris removal, Shagren said.

Inslee said officials will also assess damage to determine whether the state qualifies for a major disaster declaration that would allow people whose properties have been damaged or destroyed to seek additional resources.

"We have real significant challenges," Inslee said. "To have the president here today is actually a stroke of luck."

Inslee said Obama called Koczewski's wife to express his condolences.

Also Tuesday, Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell were among a dozen U.S. senators who sent a letter to Senate leaders asking for passage of emergency legislation to allocate $615 million to fight wildfires.

Fires are currently burning in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Utah, Arizona and California, and both Oregon and Washington have declared states of emergency.

Inslee said that while it was promising that firefighters had gained some ground on the fire, "it's still a growing and dangerous beast."

"We have a long, long ways to go in the fire season, months, before we're out of the woods," he said.

---

Online:

http://carltoncomplex.blogspot.com

http://www.dnr.wa.gov

© 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.