AP Top News at 4:34 p.m. EST

Outrage: Extremists take ancient statues, damage Iraqi site
BAGHDAD (AP) - Islamic State extremists trucked away statues as they damaged the irreplaceable remains of an ancient Assyrian capital, a local resident and a top UN official told The Associated Press Friday. Nimrud, a nearly 3,000-year-old city in present-day Iraq, included monumental statues of winged bulls, bearded horsemen and other winged figures, all symbols of an ancient Mesopotamian empire in the cradle of Western civilization.


IS group erasing history, culture in Syria, Iraq
BEIRUT (AP) - The Islamic State group's destruction of the ancient city of Nimrud in northern Iraq is part of a systematic campaign to destroy archaeological sites it says promote apostasy. Some of the world's most precious cultural treasures, including ancient sites in the cradle of civilization, are in areas controlled by the group and at the mercy of extremists bent on wiping out all non-Islamic culture and history.


Obama: Ferguson report exposed racially biased system
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - The police situation in Ferguson, Missouri, was "oppressive and abusive," President Barack Obama said Friday, as he prepared to commemorate a half-century since the historic civil rights marches in Selma, Alabama. "It turns out they weren't just making it up. This was happening," Obama said.


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Clinton's emails: Secrets, security and the law
WASHINGTON (AP) - Once again, Hillary Rodham Clinton did it her way, and it could cost her. Clinton's decision to eschew government email and use her own private server as secretary of state is raising questions about secrecy, security and the law - including whether she might have deleted important messages tapped into her ever-present BlackBerry instead of preserving them for public scrutiny and history.


'Homebrew' email servers: Genius as well as sneaky?
WASHINGTON (AP) - No, it's not always a room filled with wires and glowing blue lights. It's probably not even the size of your furnace. The personal email server used by Hillary Rodham Clinton during her time as secretary of state was most likely about the size of your office desktop computer and could have been tucked quietly in a corner somewhere. She's come a long way since 1997, when Clinton's staff bought the then-first lady a copy of the book "E-Mail for Dummies."


Why 5.5 percent unemployment isn't as great as it seems
WASHINGTON (AP) - Unemployment in the U.S. has dropped to a seven-year low of 5.5 percent - the level normally considered the mark of a healthy job market. Yet that number isn't as encouraging as it might sound. The jobless rate fell in February from 5.7 percent mainly because many people gave up looking for work and were no longer officially counted among the unemployed, the government reported Friday. What's more, wage gains remained sluggish last month.


Harrison Ford's love of flight marked by mishaps, service
LOS ANGELES (AP) - When a man battles Darth Vader, Nazis and other evildoers for work, what does he do for fun? Harrison Ford finds his answer in a pilot's license and the freedom to take to the skies. But with adventure comes risk, just as Han Solo, Indiana Jones and other daring movie characters Ford brought to life realized. On Thursday, one of Hollywood's pre-eminent stars added a plane crash to an aviation record that includes both mishaps and service to others.


5 things about the 50th anniversary of the Selma marches
WASHINGTON (AP) - This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday," a civil rights march in which protesters were beaten, trampled and tear-gassed by police at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. On March 7, 1965, marchers were walking from Selma to the state capital, Montgomery, to demand an end to discriminatory practices that robbed blacks of their right to vote. It took two more attempts for marchers to successfully complete their journey. Images of the violence during the first march shocked the nation and turned up the pressure to pass the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which helped open voter rolls to millions of Southern blacks. Five things to know about Bloody Sunday:


Remembering Selma 50 years later
It only lasted minutes, but images of sheriff's deputies lobbing tear gas and beating civil rights marchers with batons and whips on March 7, 1965 energized the nation into fighting against segregation in the South. 50 years ago, Martin Luther King Jr.'s Southern Christian Leadership Conference began a series of marches from Selma, Alabama to the state capital of Montgomery as part of a push for black voting rights.


NTSB has plenty of questions to answer in NYC runway slide
NEW YORK (AP) - As the National Transportation Safety Board begins its investigation into a Delta jetliner that slid off a runway while landing during a snowstorm at LaGuardia Airport, there is no shortage of questions to pursue: How big a factor was the snow? Was the runway too slippery? Could it have been a mechanical problem? Did the pilot come in too fast?