National & World News

AP Top News at 3:47 p.m. EDT

AP Interview: El-Sissi ready to back anti-IS fight
CAIRO (AP) - Egypt's President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi told The Associated Press on Saturday he is prepared to give whatever support is needed in the fight against the Islamic State group but called for a "comprehensive strategy" to tackle the roots of extremism across the region. In his first interview with a foreign media outlet since taking office in June, el-Sissi sought to present himself and Egypt as being at the vanguard of confronting militancy, citing it as the reason for his ouster of Egypt's first freely elected president more than a year ago - a move that brought international criticism and strained ties with top ally the United States.


Sierra Leone staggers in Ebola isolation effort
FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) - Some in Sierra Leone ran away from their homes Saturday and others clashed with health workers trying to bury dead Ebola victims as the country struggled through the second day of an unprecedented lockdown to combat the deadly disease. Despite these setbacks, officials said most of Sierra Leone's 6 million people were complying with orders to stay at home as nearly 30,000 volunteers and health care workers fanned out across the country to distribute soap and information on how to prevent Ebola.


Turkish hostages freed, but questions linger
ANKARA, Turkey (AP) - Turkish authorities say they have freed 49 hostages from one of the world's most ruthless militant groups without firing a shot, paying a ransom or offering a quid pro quo. But as the well-dressed men and women captured by the Islamic State group more than three months ago clasped their families Saturday on the tarmac of the Turkish capital's airport, experts had serious doubts about the government's story.


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Buffer zone agreed upon in Ukrainian peace talks
MINSK, Belarus (AP) - Sporadic artillery fire hit parts of eastern Ukraine on Saturday, hours after negotiators agreed to create a buffer zone between government troops and pro-Russian militants by halting their advances, pulling back heavy weapons and withdrawing foreign fighters. Despite positive developments coming out of talks in the Belarusian capital of Minsk and a cease-fire that has been in place since Sept. 5, the fighting between the two sides was still deadly.


Agents nab intruder who darted into White House
WASHINGTON (AP) - An intruder made it through the front door of the White House after scaling the mansion's fence before Secret Service agents apprehended him. The first family was not in the residence. The embarrassed agency promised a full review while new questions arose about its ability to protect the president.


Tracing shift from everyday American to jihadis
WASHINGTON (AP) - A college dropout from Florida. A nurse's aide from Denver. The owner of a pizza-and-wings joint from upstate New York. Except for their embrace of Islam, there's no common profile for the 100-plus Americans who have traveled to Syria to join Islamic fighters or are accused of supporting them from the United States.


A look at American jihadis: Why do they fight?
WASHINGTON (AP) - A look at four Americans who became jihadis, and what motivated them to fight: Moner Mohammad Abusalha, who liked to cuddle cats, blew himself up in May in Syria. He was the first American suicide bomber in that civil war.


Lack of trust keeps Iran, US away from coalition
TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - Iran and the United States share a common enemy in the Islamic State militant group, but a deep-seated lack of trust has so far kept the longtime foes from publicly joining hands in a coalition to defeat the extremists. Their inability to work together complicates efforts to beat back the extremists that both Washington and Tehran see as a threat, and has left Iraq's new government - which considers both countries allies - scratching its head as it tries to tackle the most serious threat to its stability since American troops left in 2011.


Pomp, little action expected at UN climate summit
WASHINGTON (AP) - New York City will be full of planet-saving pomp this coming week, but short on action to rescue the world. More than 120 world leaders convene Tuesday for a U.N. summit aimed at galvanizing political will for a new global climate treaty by the end of 2015.


Pope chooses a moderate for Chicago archbishop
As the leader of two American dioceses, Roman Catholic Bishop Blase Cupich has staked out a firm position in the middle of the road. He has spoken out against same-sex marriage and against conservative hostility toward gay rights advocates. He has opposed abortion, while urging parishioners and priests to have patience, not disdain, for those who disagree. And he has criticized fellow U.S. bishops who threatened to shut down religious charities instead of pursuing a compromise with the White House over health care policies that go against Catholic teaching.

 

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