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Finance minister resigns after decisive 'no' bailout vote
ATHENS, Greece (AP) - Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis resigned Monday, saying he was told shortly after Greece's decisive referendum result that some other eurozone finance ministers and the country's other creditors would appreciate his not attending the ministers' meetings. Varoufakis said Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras had judged that his resignation "might help achieve a deal" and that he was leaving the finance ministry for that reason.


The Latest: EU's Dombrovskis says 'no' vote widens gap
ATHENS, Greece (AP) - The latest on the bailout referendum in Greece (all times local): --


10 Things to Know for Today
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. GREEK FINANCE MINISTER RESIGNS AFTER `NO' BAILOUT VOTE


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More than 1 million expected at pope's Mass in South America
QUITO, Ecuador (AP) - Pope Francis travels to the Ecuadorean port of Guayaquil on Monday for a Mass expected to draw more than a million people, as Latin America's first pontiff tours his home continent with a message of compassion for the weak and respect for an ailing planet. Francis is taking it relatively easy on his first full day in Ecuador, making the quick flight to Guayaquil for the Mass at the Shrine of the Divine Mercy and then a lunch with a group of fellow Jesuits.


South Carolina lawmakers return for Confederate flag debate
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - While it appears there is broad support in the South Carolina Legislature to bring down the Confederate flag, the depth of that support will get its first test this week as lawmakers return to Columbia to come up with a specific plan. The General Assembly returns Monday to discuss Gov. Nikki Haley's budget vetoes and what to do with the rebel flag that has flown over some part of the Statehouse for more than 50 years.


Wins, setbacks mark the path to nationwide same-sex marriage
WASHINGTON (AP) - In 2004, when Massachusetts became the first state to allow same-sex couples to marry, President George W. Bush declared support for a constitutional amendment "to protect the institution of marriage." Voters in 13 states changed their constitutions to define marriage as the union of a man and a woman. In most of those states, the vote wasn't even close. Eleven years later, the Supreme Court has now ruled that all those gay marriage bans must fall and same-sex couples have the same right to marry under the Constitution as everyone else. "No longer may this liberty be denied to them," Justice Anthony Kennedy said in his June 26 opinion for the court.


Hard-hit Gaza neighborhood still trying to recover from war
SHIJAIYAH, Gaza Strip (AP) - After weeks of sharing cramped quarters with relatives during last year's war between Hamas and Israel, 39-year-old Mohammed al-Selek thought nothing of it when he heard the incoming roar of two mortar shells. But once a suffocating cloud of acrid smoke filled the stairwell, his heart sank - the family's home had been struck by Israeli fire. Moments before, he had been enjoying a rare break, relaxing with a cup of tea and cookies as he marked the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. The house was filled with his children, nieces and nephews, and al-Selek's father had taken the restless kids to play up on the rooftop, where the family kept rabbits and chickens.


Carli Lloyd becomes Captain America for US women
VANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) - For a brief time Sunday night, Carli Lloyd's Wikipedia page listed her position as "President of the United States." More like Captain America.


S. Korean violinist wants border concert with North Korea
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - Violinist Won Hyung Joon wants to bring North and South Korean musicians together next month to perform on each side of the world's most heavily armed border. Standing in the way is the rivals' long, frustrating inability to move past their painful shared history. Won says North Korean diplomats in Berlin have tentatively signed off on a plan for a renowned German conductor to lead a 70-member South Korean orchestra through Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and the Korean folk tune "Arirang" while accompanied by a choir of 70 North Koreans just across the border on Aug. 15, the 70th anniversary of the 1945 liberation of a single Korea from Japan's 35-year colonial rule.


No more 'roar' as famed trading pits come to an end
NEW YORK (AP) - Pete Meegan had every intention of going back to college, but then he got a summer job in the Chicago trading pits and fell in love with the "roar" of the floor, the excitement of "4,000 people yelling, `Buy! Buy! Buy!'" and decided no more classroom for him. That roar will soon go silent. On Monday, most futures pits in Chicago and New York, where frenzied buying and selling once helped set prices on cattle and corn, palladium and gold, and dozens of other commodities, are expected to close for good. Traders yelled and shoved and flashed hand signals, just as they did in the movie "Trading Places." But now the computer - faster, cheaper and not nearly as noisy - has taken over.

 

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