National & World News

AP Top News at 3:15 a.m. EDT

After bombs, Boston Marathon under tight security
BOSTON (AP) - For years, state and local officials have conducted a "tabletop exercise" before the Boston Marathon, a meeting that allows them to study a map of the 26.2-mile course from Hopkinton to Boston's Copley Square and plan for emergencies that could arise during the race. So many new people needed to attend the session this year that they moved it from the state's emergency bunker in Framingham to the a convention center in the city. The crowd grew from what usually is about 100 to more than 450, according to Boston Athletic Association executive director Tom Grilk, who is in charge of organizing the race.


Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines
CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests. Use of the drug in that setting is hardly rampant - just 3 percent of kids' ER visits resulted in a codeine prescription in 2010, the 10-year study found. But with more than 25 million ER visits by children each year, the authors say far too many kids are getting the drug when better options are available.


On eve of marathon, festivities and tight security
BOSTON (AP) - In many ways, it felt like any other pre-marathon Sunday in Boston. Families celebrated Easter, diners enjoyed the spring weather at sidewalk cafes, and runners - easily identified by their trim builds and colorful jackets - picked up last-minute supplies for what will be the second-largest field in the history of the Boston Marathon.


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Boston race makes room for those affected by bombs
BOSTON (AP) - "I need to run." The messages started arriving just hours after the bombings, pleading for an entry into the 2014 Boston Marathon. For months the calls and emails continued, runners begging for an opportunity to cross the finish line on Boylston Street and convinced it would ease at least some of their grief.


SKorean president: Ferry crew actions 'murderous'
JINDO, South Korea (AP) - South Korean President Park Geun-hye said Monday that the captain and some crew members of the sunken ferry committed "unforgivable, murderous behavior" in the disaster, which left more than 300 people dead or missing. The captain initially told passengers to stay in their rooms and waited more than half an hour to issue an evacuation order as the ferry Sewol sank Wednesday. By then the ship had tilted so much it is believed that many of the roughly 240 people missing could not escape.


16-year-old survives in wheel well of Maui flight
HONOLULU (AP) - A 16-year-old boy stowed away in the wheel well of a flight from California to Hawaii on Sunday, surviving the trip halfway across the Pacific Ocean unharmed despite frigid temperatures at 38,000 feet and a lack of oxygen, FBI and airline officials said. FBI spokesman Tom Simon in Honolulu told The Associated Press on Sunday night that the boy was questioned by the FBI after being discovered on the tarmac at the Maui airport with no identification.


Sherpas consider boycott after Everest disaster
KATMANDU, Nepal (AP) - Sherpa guides on Mount Everest are considering a climbing boycott after the deadliest avalanche in the mountain's history, a move that could seriously disrupt the rest of the climbing season, a mountaineering official said Monday. Several Sherpas already have quit while others are still deciding whether to boycott climbing following Friday's avalanche, said Ang Tshering of the Nepal Mountaineering Association.


John Paul's legacy stained by sex abuse scandal
VATICAN CITY (AP) - Pope John Paul II is rightly credited with having helped bring down communism, of inspiring a new generation of Catholics with a globe-trotting papacy and of explaining church teaching on a range of hot-button issues as Christianity entered its third millennium. But the sexual abuse scandal that festered under his watch remains a stain on his legacy.


Cuba home woes endure despite real-estate reform
HAVANA (AP) - The residents of 308 Oquendo Street were jolted awake in the middle of the night by violent shaking and a noise that they likened to a freight train, or an exploding bomb. Part of their building's seventh floor had collapsed into the interior patio, heavily damaging apartments on the floors below. No one died, but the 120 families living in the building were left homeless.


Car hits packed Florida church, injuring about 20
FORT MYERS, Fla. (AP) - A car slammed into a packed Florida church Sunday night just as its annual Easter concert was about to begin, barreling through its brick outer wall and several rows of pews and injuring about 20 people, authorities said. The Lexus sedan struck the Second Haitian Baptist Church at around 8 p.m. Sunday, when there were about 200 people inside, Fort Myers police Lt. Victor Medico said. When officers arrived at the scene, church members were using car jacks to lift the vehicle off of people who were trapped beneath the vehicle, The (Fort Myers) News-Press reported (http://newspr.es/1i7MLTihttp://newspr.es/1i7MLTi ).

 

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