National & World News

AP Top News at 12:57 p.m. EDT

Train crashes into New Jersey station; 1 dead, 100-plus hurt
HOBOKEN, N.J. (AP) - A crowded commuter train crashed into the bustling Hoboken station during the morning rush hour Thursday, killing at least one person and injuring more than 100 others, some critically, in a tangle of broken concrete, twisted metal and dangling cables, authorities said. People pulled concrete off bleeding victims and passengers kicked out windows and crawled out amid crying and screaming after the arriving New Jersey Transit train smashed through a barrier at the end of its track and ground to a halt in a covered waiting area. It apparently knocked out pillars, collapsing a section of the roof onto the first car.


DIVIDED AMERICA: Minorities hopeful, whites sour on future
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - Consider two women in their 70s, both residents of the Kansas City area. One is white and affluent; the other is black and working class. Guess which one is more optimistic about the country's future and that of their grandchildren? More than likely, you guessed wrong. --- EDITOR'S NOTE - This is part of Divided America, AP's ongoing exploration of the economic, social and political divisions in American society. --- This year's presidential campaign has underscored an economic paradox: Financially, black Americans and Hispanics are far worse off than whites, yet polls show minorities are more likely than whites to believe in the American Dream.


Clinton visits Iowa as early voting gets underway
WASHINGTON (AP) - With early voting poised to play a bigger role in this year's election, Hillary Clinton was urging voters in Iowa to start casting ballots on Thursday, more than five weeks before Election Day. Clinton's 10-city tour of Iowa brought the Democratic presidential nominee back to a state where she eked out a win in the caucuses over Bernie Sanders. With her focus now on defeating Donald Trump, Clinton was hoping that putting an emphasis on early voting could help her replicate President Barack Obama's successful strategy in the battleground state four years ago. In Des Moines, Clinton planned a speech focused on childcare challenges faced by middle-class families.


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Russia accuses US of siding with 'terrorists' in Syria
MOSCOW (AP) - Russian officials accused the U.S. on Thursday of siding with "terrorists" in Syria, in a sign of escalating tensions between Moscow and Washington amid the battle for Aleppo. U.S. State Department spokesman John Kirby's warning that the collapse of U.S.-Russian cooperation in Syria could lead to a rise in extremism and potential attacks against Russia drew Moscow's anger. The Russian Foreign and Defense Ministries both cast it as U.S. encouragement of terror attacks on Russia. "We can't assess those statements as anything else but a call, a directive for action," Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said at a briefing.


Israelis pay respects to Peres, Clinton arrives in Israel
JERUSALEM (AP) - Former U.S. President Bill Clinton joined thousands of Israeli mourners Thursday who paid their respects to the late Shimon Peres outside Israel's parliament in Jerusalem, as the country somberly remembered the Nobel-winning politician who helped lead Israel during a remarkable seven-decade career. Clinton is among the dozens of current and former world leaders, including President Barack Obama and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, expected to gather in Jerusalem on Friday for Peres' funeral. The former Israeli president and prime minister died Wednesday, two weeks after suffering a stroke, at the age of 93. Jordan's King Abdullah II sent his condolences to Israel over the passing of Peres.


Teen's mother 'shocked and saddened' by school shooting
TOWNVILLE, S.C. (AP) - The mother of a teen accused of killing his father and wounding two students and a teacher at a rural South Carolina elementary school says his family is "shocked and saddened." In a statement that Pastor James South provided to local media outlets, Tiffney Osborne says the family "cannot express the devastation we feel at the loss of our beloved Jeff." Authorities said the shooting began Wednesday afternoon at the teen's house about 2 miles from rural Townville Elementary School, where he gunned down his 47-year-old father, Jeffrey Osborne. Authorities have not released the suspect's name or age beyond saying he's a teen.


Obama saw override coming, but still it stung
WASHINGTON (AP) - The White House saw it coming, but still it stung. When President Barack Obama was hit with the first veto override of his two terms, it was a clear reminder of his dwindling political influence, years of confounding relationships with Congress and shaky prospects for the few legislative priorities he has left. The fiercely competitive president has said he intends to keep working with Congress until the final buzzer sounds in January, but it's not clear how much juice he'll have left. Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada was the only one among 44 Democrats in the Senate to stand by Obama in upholding his veto of a piece of Sept.


Scientists: World likely won't avoid dangerous warming mark
WASHINGTON (AP) - A team of top scientists is telling world leaders to stop congratulating themselves on the Paris agreement to fight climate change because if more isn't done, global temperatures will likely hit dangerous warming levels in about 35 years. Six scientists who were leaders in past international climate conferences joined with the Universal Ecological Fund in Argentina to release a brief report Thursday, saying that if even more cuts in heat-trapping gases aren't agreed upon soon, the world will warm by another 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (1 degree Celsius) by around 2050. That 1.8 degree mark is key because in 2009 world leaders agreed that they wanted to avoid warming of 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels.


'Amanda Knox' pulls back the curtain on a media circus
NEW YORK (AP) - Amanda Knox stares into the camera, coolly contemplating how she became a figure of global fascination. "I think people love monsters. And so when they get the chance, they want to see them. It's people projecting their fears," Knox says. "They want the reassurance that they know who the bad people are, and it's not them. So maybe that's what it is: We're all afraid, and fear makes people crazy." Such is the provocative opening of "Amanda Knox," a documentary premiering Friday on Netflix that gives the participants of one of the most sensational trials of the century a chance to tell their story, straightforwardly, directly to the camera.

 

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