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AP Top News at 11:32 a.m. EST

Trump denounces 'horrible' threats against Jewish centers
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump on Tuesday denounced recent threats against Jewish community centers as "horrible" and "painful." He said they are a "very sad reminder of the work that still must be done to root out hate and prejudice and evil." Trump made the remarks after touring the newly opened National Museum of African American History and Culture. "This tour was a meaningful reminder of why we have to fight bigotry, intolerance and hatred in all of its very ugly forms," Trump said. His comments about recent threats at Jewish community centers across the country marked the first time he had directly addressed a wave of anti-Semitism and followed a more general White House denouncement of "hatred and hate-motivated violence." That statement, earlier Tuesday, did not mention the community center incidents or Jews.


Trump's new national security adviser a soldier-scholar
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump has chosen as his national security adviser a soldier-scholar who fought in both Iraq wars and wrote an influential book that called out the U.S. government for "lies" that led to the Vietnam War. Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster would remain on active military duty while leading the National Security Council, White House officials said Monday. He joined two retired generals - Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly - already in Trump's inner circle, adding to the impression that the president prefers military men in top roles. Trump called McMaster "a man of tremendous talent and tremendous experience" when he introduced his new national security adviser at his private Florida club.


Israeli court gives soldier 18 months for fatal shooting
TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) - An Israeli military court on Tuesday sentenced a soldier to 18 months in prison for his deadly shooting of a Palestinian attacker who lay wounded on the ground, capping a nearly yearlong saga that has deeply divided the country. The sentence, which included a year's probation and a demotion in rank, was lighter than expected. Prosecutors had asked for a prison term of three to five years. Palestinians dismissed the sentence as a "joke." Yet it still triggered disappointment from several hundred protesters who had gathered outside the Tel Aviv court and had hoped to see the soldier walk free.


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Pinpointing cause of death for NK's Kim Jong Nam may be hard
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) - Determining whether poison killed the half brother of North Korea's leader in a busy airport is proving difficult for Malaysian officials, who said Tuesday that autopsy results are so far inconclusive. More than a week has passed since Kim Jong Nam was approached by two women at a budget air terminal in Kuala Lumpur and apparently attacked in the face with an unknown substance. Kim did not suffer a heart attack and had no puncture wounds, such as those a needle would have left, Director General of Health Noor Hisham Abdullah told reporters. He did not dismiss poison as a potential cause.


In Trump's future looms a familiar shutdown threat
WASHINGTON (AP) - Add a potential government shutdown to President Donald Trump's growing roster of headaches. Beneath the capital's radar looms a vexing problem - a catchall spending package that's likely to top $1 trillion and could get embroiled in the politics of building Trump's wall at the U.S.-Mexico border and a budget-busting Pentagon request. While a shutdown deadline has a few weeks to go, the huge measure looms as an unpleasant reality check for Trump and Republicans controlling Congress. Despite the big power shift in Washington, the path to success - and averting a shuttering of the government - goes directly through Senate Democrats, whose votes are required to pass the measure.


Supreme Court seems split in case of boy's death near border
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court appears to be evenly divided about the right of Mexican parents to use American courts to sue a U.S. Border Patrol agent who fired across the U.S.-Mexican border and killed their teenage son. Justice Anthony Kennedy and other conservative justices suggested during argument Tuesday that the boy's death on the Mexican side of the border was enough to keep the matter out of U.S. courts. The four liberal justices indicated they would support the parents' lawsuit because the shooting happened close to the border in an area in which the two nations share responsibility for upkeep.


4 US tourists and pilot killed in Australian plane crash
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) - An Australian pilot and four American tourists on a golfing vacation were killed when a light plane crashed in flames into a shopping mall on Tuesday shortly after takeoff in the Australian city of Melbourne, officials said. The five were on a twin-engine Beechcraft Super King Air that crashed about 45 minutes before the Direct Factory Outlet mall in suburban Essendon was to open, Police Minister Lisa Neville said. The U.S. Embassy in Canberra confirmed that four victims were U.S. citizens. Texans Greg Reynolds De Haven and Russell Munsch have been identified by their families on social media as two of the victims.


Testosterone gel shows no benefit for older men's memories
CHICAGO (AP) - Testosterone treatment did not improve older men's memory or mental function in the latest results from landmark government research that challenges the anti-aging claims of popular supplements. While testosterone use for one year appeared to strengthen bones and reduce anemia, it also showed signs of worsening artery disease and questions remain about other potential risks. The researchers said more studies are needed to determine long-term effects - the kind of research the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has already asked supplement makers to conduct. "I don't think anybody would interpret these results as saying, 'Wow, this is a fountain of youth, this is a magical anti-aging potion,'" said study co-author Susan Ellenberg, a University of Pennsylvania researcher.


Sticker shock for olive oil buyers after bad Italian harvest
ROME (AP) - From specialty shops in Rome to supermarkets around the world, lovers of Italian olive oil are in for some sticker shock this year, with prices due to jump by as much as 20 percent. The combination of bad weather and pests hit the harvest in Southern Europe, most of all in Italy, where production is halved from last fall. That's pushing up Italian wholesale prices by 64 percent as of mid-February compared with a year earlier, which translates to shelf price increases of 15 to 20 percent in Italy. In other countries, the ultimate price increases will depend on several factors - such as how much retailers take on the costs themselves and the change in currency values.


Iraqi forces on Mosul hilltop gird for fierce fight ahead
ABU SAIF, Iraq (AP) - Iraqi troops worked to secure a strategic hilltop overlooking Mosul's international airport and a nearby military base on Tuesday, fearing the Islamic State group, which still holds both facilities, may launch another wave of nighttime counterattacks. The U.S.-backed Iraqi forces advancing on western Mosul from the south have not seen the waves of car bombs that troops confronted when they moved into eastern Mosul late last year. But the latest battle, launched on Sunday, is still in its early stages. As the militarized Federal Police stationed in the hilltop village of Abu Saif scanned a nearby cluster of houses for militants, they spotted around a dozen civilians waving white flags.

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