Post-Athenian
 LATEST NEWS
 Top Stories
 U.S.
  Severe Weather
  Bird Flu
 World
  Castro
  Mideast Crisis
  Iraq
 Business
 Personal Finance
 Technology
 Sports
  Sports Columns
  NASCAR
  Baseball
  College Hoops
  NBA
  NHL
  Tennis
  Golf
 Entertainment
 Health
 Science
 Politics
 Washington
 Offbeat
 Podcasts
 Blogs
 Weather
 Raw News
 NEWS SEARCH
 
 Archive Search
 SPECIAL SECTIONS
 Multimedia Gallery
 AP Video Network
 Today
 in History
 Corrections
AP Top News at 11:51 p.m. EDT

Fence-jumper makes it into the White House
WASHINGTON (AP) - A man jumped over the fence of the White House on Friday and made it into the presidential residence before officers managed to apprehend him, the U.S. Secret Service said. President Barack Obama and his family were not at home at the time. Omar J. Gonzalez, 42, of Copperas Cove, Texas, was taken into custody just inside the North Portico doors, Secret Service spokesman Ed Donovan said. He was placed under arrest and was transported to a Washington hospital after complaining of chest pain.


AP Exclusive: CIA halts spying in Europe
WASHINGTON (AP) - The CIA has curbed spying on friendly governments in Western Europe in response to the furor over a German caught selling secrets to the United States and the Edward Snowden revelations of classified information held by the National Security Agency, according to current and former U.S. officials. The pause in decades of espionage, which remains partially in effect, was designed to give CIA officers time to examine whether they were being careful enough and to evaluate whether spying on allies is worth running the risk of discovery, said a U.S. official who has been briefed on the situation.


France joins US against Islamic State over Iraq
PARIS (AP) - France is back at America's side in conducting military strikes in Iraq. More than a decade after spurning President George W. Bush's war against Saddam Hussein, France on Friday became the first country to join U.S. forces pounding targets inside Iraq from the air in recent weeks - this time in pursuit of militants of the Islamic State group.


Watch Top News Video




After vote to stay in UK, Scots must heal divide
EDINBURGH, Scotland (AP) - Following a long night that brought floods of relief for some and bitter disappointment for others, Scotland awoke with a hangover Friday after voting to reject independence. Now, the task was to heal the divide - and use the energy the referendum unleashed to hold London politicians to promises of more powers for Scotland.


Brown credited with turning Scot independence tide
KIRKCALDY, Scotland (AP) - Dour. Grim. Downright uninspiring. When Gordon Brown ended a disappointing three years as British prime minister in 2010, few would have credited him as the man most likely to swing a popular vote ever again. Yet, the former Labour Party leader and 63-year-old Scot has emerged as the oratorical star of Scotland's Better Together campaign, the man most responsible for persuading wavering voters to stick with Great Britain by emphasizing why they should be proud to be British.


APNewsBreak: Cupich to be next Chicago archbishop
Bishop Blase Cupich of Spokane, Washington, will be named the next archbishop of Chicago, The Associated Press has learned. Cupich will succeed Cardinal Francis George, according to a person with knowledge of the selection, who spoke Friday on the condition of anonymity because the person wasn't authorized to speak publicly. George, 77, has been battling cancer and has said he believes the disease will end his life.


3 guilty in Ga. salmonella-tainted peanut trial
ALBANY, Ga. (AP) - More than five years after hundreds of Americans got sick from eating salmonella-tainted peanut butter, the top executive at the Georgia plant where it was made was convicted Friday and faces prison time in a rare food-poisoning trial that advocates said sends a stern warning to others who may be tempted to place profits over safety. Former Peanut Corporation of America owner Stewart Parnell, 60, could face more than three decades in prison after being found guilty of conspiracy, obstruction of justice, wire fraud and other crimes related to the outbreak in 2008 and 2009 that was linked to nine deaths and prompted one of the largest food recalls in U.S. history. His brother, Michael Parnell, and a second co-defendant could face 20 years in prison or more.


License plate scanner networks capture movements
LOS ANGELES (AP) - A rapidly expanding digital network that uses cameras mounted to traffic signals and police cruisers captures the movements of millions of vehicles across the U.S., regardless of whether the drivers are being investigated by law enforcement. The license plate scanning systems have multiplied across the U.S. over the last decade, funded largely by Homeland Security grants, and judges recently have upheld authorities' rights to keep details from hundreds of millions of scans a secret from the public.


Congress backs Obama on aid to Syrian rebels
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama on Friday signed into law legislation authorizing the military to arm and train moderate Syrian rebels fighting Islamic State militants in the Middle East. Obama acted a day after a Senate vote capped congressional action on the request, which passed by wide margins despite reservation about whether his strategy will do enough to stop the surging terrorist group, which has seized large swaths of Iraq and Syria. Congress will revisit the issue after the midterm elections.


Florida State suspends Winston for entire game
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) - Florida State has suspended Jameis Winston for the entire game against Clemson on Saturday, interim President Garnett S. Stokes and athletic director Stan Wilcox announced late Friday night. Winston was originally suspended for just the first half after making "offensive and vulgar" comments about female anatomy on campus Tuesday.