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AP Top News at 9:54 a.m. EDT

Guilty verdict in peanut trial should send warning
ALBANY, Ga. (AP) - Food safety advocates say a guilty verdict in a rare federal food-poisoning trial should send a stern warning to anyone who may be tempted to place profits over people's welfare. More than five years after hundreds of Americans got sick from eating salmonella-tainted peanut butter, the top executive in the company that owned the Georgia plant where it was made was convicted Friday of conspiracy, obstruction of justice, wire fraud and other crimes related the nationwide outbreak in 2008 and 2009.


Buffer zone agreed on in Ukrainian peace talks
MINSK, Belarus (AP) - Negotiators in Ukrainian peace talks agreed early Saturday to create a buffer zone between government troops and pro-Russian militants by halting their advances, pulling back heavy weapons and withdrawing foreign fighters in order to ensure a stable truce in eastern Ukraine. The deal reached by representatives of Ukraine, Russia, the Moscow-backed rebels and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe marks an effort to add substance to a cease-fire agreement that was signed on Sept. 5 but has been frequently broken by clashes.


Turkey: 49 hostages have been freed
ANKARA, Turkey (AP) - Dozens of Turkish hostages seized by the Islamic State group in Iraq were freed Saturday, resolving a serious crisis which Turkish officials had long cited as a reason to avoid moving aggressively against the violent militant group. The 49 hostages were captured from the Turkish Consulate in Mosul, Iraq on June 11, when the Islamic State group overran the city in its surge to seize large swaths of Iraq and Syria. But the circumstances of their release - which drew flag waving crowds to the Turkish capital's airport - were clouded in mystery.


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Scottish teens proud, passionate about voting
EDINBURGH, Scotland (AP) - They arrived before polling stations even opened, dressed for the school day in striped ties and blazers, dress slacks and tartan skirts, book bags over their shoulders - and for the first time in British history, ballot cards in hand. Scotland's experiment of allowing more than 100,000 teens aged 16 to 17 to take part in this week's independence referendum has demonstrated how the youngest voters can be some of the most enthusiastic in a mature democracy. More than 90 percent of the previously disenfranchised teens registered to vote - and, to the surprise of many analysts, proved not so ready to rebel against their parents as might be expected.


Security breached: Intruder gets into White House
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Secret Service is coming under renewed scrutiny after a man scaled the White House fence and made it all the way through the front door before he was apprehended. President Barack Obama and his daughters had just left the White House on Friday evening when the intruder climbed the north fence, darted across the lawn and into the residence, where agents nabbed him.


Obama faces questions on prospect of expanded war
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama's military campaign against Islamic State group extremists has already crept beyond the narrow parameters he first outlined three months ago. But military experts both inside and outside of the administration argue that even more may be needed for the mission to succeed, including embedding U.S. ground troops with Iraqi security forces who are on the front line of the fight against the violent militants. Taking that step could put Obama dangerously close to violating his pledges to keep Americans out of combat in Iraq.


Tracing shift from everyday American to jihadis
WASHINGTON (AP) - A college dropout from Florida. A nurse's aide from Denver. The owner of a pizza-and-wings joint from upstate New York. Except for their embrace of Islam, there's no common profile for the 100-plus Americans who have traveled to Syria to join Islamic fighters or are accused of supporting them from the United States.


A look at American jihadis: Why do they fight?
WASHINGTON (AP) - A look at four Americans who became jihadis, and what motivated them to fight: Moner Mohammad Abusalha, who liked to cuddle cats, blew himself up in May in Syria. He was the first American suicide bomber in that civil war.


Armed officers comb ambush suspect's woods
CANADENSIS, Pa. (AP) - Authorities who spent the night in the neighborhood where a man suspected in the fatal shooting of a Pennsylvania State Police trooper lived with his parents donned bulletproof vests and gathered heavy rifles before fanning out Saturday morning. The burst of activity followed a long night that included gunshots and police telling residents to stay in their homes.


CIA stops spying on friendly nations in W. Europe
WASHINGTON (AP) - Stung by the backlash over a German caught selling secrets to the U.S. and the revelations of surveillance by the National Security Agency, the CIA has stopped spying on friendly governments in Western Europe, according to current and former U.S. officials. The pause in decades of espionage was designed to give CIA officers time to examine whether they were being careful enough and to evaluate whether spying on allies is worth running the risk of discovery, said a U.S. official who has been briefed on the situation.