AP Top News at 3:11 p.m. EDT

Clinton and Kaine debut as Democratic ticket in Florida
MIAMI (AP) - Hillary Clinton introduced running mate Tim Kaine as "a progressive who likes to get things done," joining the Virginia senator in the crucial battleground state of Florida to help kick off next week's Democratic National Convention. Clinton said Kaine cares more about making a difference than making headlines, and is "everything that Donald Trump and Mike Pence are not." "I like to fight for right," Kaine said, detailing his life in public service. Speaking at times in Spanish, he drew comparisons between the Democratic ticket and Trump. "Isn't it great already," he said of America. Clinton offered Kaine the vice presidential spot on the Democratic ticket in a phone call on Friday night.


Kaine liberal appeal muted by energy ties, abortion concerns
WASHINGTON (AP) - Hillary Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine are closely aligned on many issues, but Kaine's cautious, left-leaning political profile in a closely contested state is blurred by his ties to energy industry interests and his personal qualms over abortion. The Virginia senator is regarded as a careful, earnest politician who has navigated the rough-and-tumble of his state's hard-fought electoral landscape with few ethical missteps. Minor controversies have flared over paid travel and gifts he received during his stints as governor and senator. A Harvard-trained lawyer who prospered as Richmond's mayor before moving on to higher office, Kaine endorsed Clinton early in her presidential run, in contrast to 2008 when he backed Barack Obama over Clinton early on.


Police: Munich suspect was obsessed with mass shootings
MUNICH (AP) - The gunman whose rampage at a Munich mall left nine people dead was a depression-plagued teenager who avidly read books and articles about mass killings and apparently tried to lure young victims to their deaths through a faked Facebook posting, authorities said Saturday. Information from witnesses indicated that his hatred of foreigners might have played a role in the mass shooting, even though he himself was the German-born son of Iranian asylum-seekers. Most of the dead were youths and all were Munich residents of varied ethnic backgrounds. Hueseyin Bayri, who witnessed one boy's death, told The Associated Press the shooter screamed a profanity about foreigners and said "I will kill you all" as he pulled the trigger.


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IS attacks protest in Afghan capital, kills 80 people
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) - The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing on a peaceful protest in the Afghan capital on Saturday that killed at least 80 people and wounded more than 200, marking the first time the extremists have struck Kabul and raising fears of their growing strength and capability in Afghanistan. The attack was the deadliest to hit Kabul in 15 years of civil war. It struck a demonstration by Afghanistan's Hazara ethnic community, who were marching for a major regional power line to be routed through their home province. The Hazaras are Shiite Muslims, most Afghans are Sunnis.


AP Poll: Support grows among Americans for stricter gun laws
Americans increasingly favor tougher gun laws by margins that have grown wider after a steady drumbeat of shootings in recent months, but they also are pessimistic that change will happen anytime soon, according to a new Associated Press-GfK poll. Nearly two-thirds of respondents expressed support for stricter laws, with majorities favoring nationwide bans on the sale of semi-automatic assault weapons such as the AR-15 and on the sale of high-capacity magazines holding 10 or more bullets. The percentage of Americans who want such laws is the highest since the AP-GfK poll started asking the question in 2013, a survey taken about 10 months after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, that killed 20 children and six educators.


Hacked emails show Democratic party hostility to Sanders
WASHINGTON (AP) - A cache of more than 19,000 emails from Democratic party officials, leaked in advance of Hillary Clinton's nomination at the party's convention next week in Philadelphia, details the acrimonious split between the Democratic National Committee and Clinton's former rival, Sen. Bernie Sanders. Several emails posted by Wikileaks on its document disclosure website show DNC officials scoffing at Sanders and his supporters and in one instance, questioning his commitment to his Jewish religion. Some emails also show DNC and White House officials mulling whether to invite guests with controversial backgrounds to Democratic party events. Although Wikileaks' posting of the emails Friday did not disclose the identity of who provided the private material, those knowledgeable about the breach said last month that Russian hackers had penetrated the DNC computer system.


How sympathetic whites are helping to fuel racial change
MEDFORD, Mass. (AP) - An attorney in Oregon is supporting political candidates who promise to address racial profiling in policing. In suburban Ohio, a mother says she and her friends will push for better racial integration in their children's high school. And in rural Massachusetts, a young father has launched a Facebook group called "White Men for Black Lives." After standing silently on the sidelines, some whites who agree with demands by civil rights activists for greater police reforms say they're being spurred to action following this summer's fatal shootings of black men by officers in Minnesota and Louisiana and the deadly retaliation attacks on police in Texas and Louisiana.


Boy Scouts faring well a year after easing ban on gay adults
NEW YORK (AP) - There were dire warnings for the Boy Scouts of America a year ago when the group's leaders, under intense pressure, voted to end a long-standing blanket ban on participation by openly gay adults. Several of the biggest sponsors of Scout units, including the Roman Catholic, Mormon and Southern Baptist churches, were openly dismayed, raising the prospect of mass defections. Remarkably, nearly 12 months after the BSA National Executive Board's decision, the Boy Scouts seem more robust than they have in many years. Youth membership is on the verge of stabilizing after a prolonged decline, corporations which halted donations because of the ban have resumed their support, and the vast majority of units affiliated with conservative religious denominations have remained in the fold - still free to exclude gay adults if that's in accordance with their religious doctrine.


Scientists work toward storing digital information in DNA
NEW YORK (AP) - Her computer, Karin Strauss says, contains her "digital attic" - a place where she stores that published math paper she wrote in high school, and computer science schoolwork from college. She'd like to preserve the stuff "as long as I live, at least," says Strauss, 37. But computers must be replaced every few years, and each time she must copy the information over, "which is a little bit of a headache." It would be much better, she says, if she could store it in DNA - the stuff our genes are made of. Strauss, who works at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington, is working to make that sci-fi fantasy a reality.


Millions of orchids grow on former mine site in upstate NY
STAR LAKE, N.Y. (AP) - Millions of orchids are now growing in a hundred-acre wetland in the Adirondack Park that developed on waste from a vast open-pit iron mine, a transformation scientists say is most impressive because it happened naturally. "It's a testament to nature's ability to heal itself," said Grete Bader, a graduate student who recently wrote her master's thesis about the plant life at the former Benson Mines, about 35 miles from the Canadian border. The wetland, which remains privately owned and off limits to the public, formed on part of thousands of acres of coarse sand left over when granite ore was crushed to extract iron from 1900 until 1978.