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Punishments but no criminal charges in US attack on hospital
WASHINGTON (AP) - A U.S. gunship attack on a hospital in Afghanistan that killed 42 people occurred because of human errors, process errors and equipment failures and none of the crew knew they were striking a trauma center, a top U.S. general said Friday. No criminal charges have been leveled against U.S. military personnel for mistakes that resulted in last's year's attack on the civilian hospital in Afghanistan operated by the medical charity Doctors Without Borders. The group has called the attack a war crime. Gen. Joseph Votel, the new head of U.S. Central Command, said that the trauma center was on a no-strike list but that the gunship crew didn't have access to the list.


Violence in Syria's Aleppo kills many including worshippers
DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) - Insurgents shelled a government-held area in the contested city of Aleppo, hitting a mosque and killing at least 15 people as they left Friday prayers, while government airstrikes struck rebel-held parts of Syria's largest city - even as the army unilaterally declared a brief truce in other parts of the country. The violence in Aleppo has killed more than 200 civilians over the past week and is likely to continue unchecked, as the government's cease-fire does not include the city. At least 15 people were killed and 30 injured when rockets struck Malla Khan mosque in the government-held Bab al-Faraj district shortly after Friday prayers, Syrian state TV reported.


Trump making case to GOP insiders after chaotic rally scene
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Donald Trump, the outsider, is making his case to California's Republican establishment after he kicked off his crucial campaign for the state's presidential primary with an enormous rally marred by confrontations between protesters and his supporters on the streets. The front-runner and his two rivals pitch their campaigns from the stage and in behind-the-scenes cajoling at the GOP convention outside San Francisco, with Trump and Ohio Gov. John Kasich appearing Friday and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and his new running mate, Carly Fiorina, up Saturday. It's a key event in the campaign for the nation's largest GOP primary, June 7, an exercise that usually comes after the party nominees are known but this time looms as a decisive contest that could either clinch the prize for Trump or force him into a contested convention in July.


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Cruz getting Indiana governor's endorsement
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - In a setback for Donald Trump, Indiana's governor is endorsing chief rival Ted Cruz before the state's critical Republican primary contest. Indiana Gov. Mike Pence will announce his support for Cruz on Friday afternoon, according to a Republican official with direct knowledge of the endorsement. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to pre-empt the announcement. Cruz is desperately seeking momentum in his fight to block Trump from claiming the delegate majority before the GOP's national convention in July. A Trump win in Indiana on Tuesday would all but ensure he becomes the presumptive nominee.


North Korea sends another US citizen to prison
PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) - North Korea on Friday sentenced a U.S. citizen of Korean heritage to 10 years in prison with hard labor after convicting him of espionage and subversion, the second American it has put behind bars this year. Kim Dong Chul was sentenced after a brief trial in Pyongyang by North Korea's Supreme Court, which found him guilty of espionage and subversion under Articles 60 and 64 of the North's criminal code. North Korea regularly accuses Washington and Seoul of sending spies in an attempt to overthrow its government. Outsiders say North Korea seeks to use its U.S.


Russia's nuclear nightmare flows down radioactive river
MUSLYUMOVO, Russia (AP) - At first glance, Gilani Dambaev looks like a healthy 60-year-old man and the river flowing past his rural family home appears pristine. But Dambaev is riddled with diseases that his doctors link to a lifetime's exposure to excessive radiation, and the Geiger counter beeps loudly as a reporter strolls down to the muddy riverbank. Some 50 kilometers (30 miles) upstream from Dambaev's crumbling village lies Mayak, a nuclear complex that has been responsible for at least two of the country's biggest radioactive accidents. Worse, environmentalists say, is the facility's decades-old record of using the Arctic-bound waters of the Techa River to dump waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, hundreds of tons of which is imported annually from neighboring nations.


Most states do bare minimum on fire-foam contamination
The military is checking U.S. bases for potential groundwater contamination from a toxic firefighting foam, but most states so far show little inclination to examine civilian sites for the same threat. The foam was likely used around the country at certain airports, refineries and other sites where catastrophic petroleum fires were a risk, but an Associated Press survey of emergency management, environmental and health agencies in all 50 states showed most haven't tracked its use and don't even know whether it was used, where or when. Only five states - Alaska, Minnesota, New Jersey, Vermont and Wisconsin - are tracking the chemicals used in the foam and spilled from other sources through ongoing water monitoring or by looking for potentially contaminated sites.


At the Vatican, Biden calls for global commitment to cancer
VATICAN CITY (AP) - Saying cancer is a scourge with no boundaries, Vice President Joe Biden came to the Vatican on Friday to call for a global commitment to fund cancer research that benefits everyone, not just the "privileged and powerful." Biden, who lost a son to cancer last year, used his appearance at a Vatican conference on regenerative medicine to urge philanthropists, corporations and governments to increase funding and information-sharing in a bid to "end cancer as we know it." He said the world is on the cusp of unprecedented breakthroughs but said the world still has not done enough.


AP Exclusive: Prince's 'Purple Rain' coat is up for auction
CALABASAS, Calif. (AP) - A rare piece of movie memorabilia from Prince's 1984 classic film "Purple Rain" is hitting the auction block. Prince donned the black-and-white blazer with leather sleeves while riding a motorcycle with co-star Apollonia Kotero. "It's definitely the most important piece of screen-worn Prince clothing that's ever come up for auction," said Joe Maddalena, president of the Calabasas, California-based auction house, Profiles in History. "This is a signature piece of wardrobe worn from an iconic movie in his most famous role." The coat is a unique find from the typically reclusive artist, who was found dead last week at his Paisley Park complex just outside of Minneapolis.


Park workers in Spain discover huge Roman coin trove
MADRID (AP) - Workers laying pipes in a southern Spanish park have unearthed a 600-kilogram (1,300-pound) trove of Roman coins in what culture officials say is a unique historic discovery. The Seville Archaeological Museum said the construction workers came across 19 amphoras containing thousands of bronze and silver-coated coins dating from the end of the fourth century. The coins are believed to have been recently minted at the time and had probably been stored away to pay soldiers or civil servants. Museum director Ana Navarro said the discovery Wednesday in the southern town of Tomares outside Seville is unique for Spain and of incalculable value.