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Presidential race shows deep seated strife toward minorities
WASHINGTON (AP) - It started with Mexicans being publicly accused by presidential candidate Donald Trump of being criminals and rapists. It escalated to ejections, to sucker punches, to pepper spray. And now violence and strife seems to be a commonplace occurrence out on the campaign trail. As the 2016 presidential campaign turns toward the rapidly diversifying West, it has officially buried any thoughts of a post-racial United States, with racial and ethnic groups at the center of the most public strife seen in the political arena since the height of the civil rights movement. Much of the violence has revolved around the ascendancy of GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump, first toward minorities and now by minorities protesting his policies.


Expecting worst, holiday travelers find fast airport lines
ATLANTA (AP) - Fast moving airport security lines at the start of the Memorial Day weekend could bode well for return travelers Monday. Travelers reported moving quickly through airport checkpoints Friday after authorities opened extra screening lanes and used bomb-sniffing dogs to give some passengers a break from removing their shoes. "Wow. I mean, wow," said Mike Saresky, who flew into Chicago from Philadelphia, where he breezed through airport security in 12 minutes and got to leave his shoes on. "I thought it was going to be a lot worse." The extra dogs were concentrated at the nation's largest airports, but they were not used for all screenings, meaning that many travelers still had to observe the usual procedures.


Death on Everest leads to risky effort to recover bodies
KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) - The mountain is speckled with corpses. Nearly 300 people have died on Mount Everest in the century or so since climbers have been trying to reach its summit. At least 100 of them are still on the mountain, perhaps 200. Most of the bodies are hidden in deep crevasses or covered by snow and ice, but some are visible to every climber who passes by, landmarks in heavy plastic climbing boots and colorful parkas that fade a little more every year. The most famous corpses get nicknames - "Green Boots," ''Sleeping Beauty," ''The German" - becoming warnings of what can go wrong on the 8,850-meter (29,035-foot) peak, even as they become part of the mountain's gallows humor.


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In business and politics, Trump stokes internal rivalries
WASHINGTON (AP) - When Donald Trump acquired a pair of Atlantic City casinos in the mid-1980s, he pitted his managers against each other in a ferocious competition over everything from booking entertainers to attracting high-rolling gamblers. That one of those managers was his wife, Ivana Trump, didn't earn her any slack. "His tactic there, as our success surpassed the Castle's in 1987, was to shove the Plaza's performance in Ivana's face, like a mirror, holding it up for her to see the reflection of a less than successful manager," John O'Donnell, Ivana Trump's rival in the casino wars, wrote in a 1991 book.


Texas braces for possibly more rain after flooding kills 1
BRENHAM, Texas (AP) - At least one person was dead and three others were missing after torrential thunderstorms caused flooding in Texas, officials said as they braced for the possibility of more rain over the long Memorial Day weekend. "It's not going to take very much rain to get us in those flood stages again," Washington County Judge John Brieden said Friday. The forecasts through the holiday weekend called for scattered or isolated thunderstorms in Central and Southeast Texas. But officials say they will be monitoring local rivers and waterways, which could rise out of their banks in the coming days due to the heavy rains.


Small WWII-era plane crashes in Hudson River; body recovered
NEW YORK (AP) - A small World War II vintage plane taking part in celebrations of its 75th anniversary flew a partial loop while smoke spewed from it and then crashed in the Hudson River between New York and New Jersey on Friday, and divers recovered a body from its sunken wreckage, police and witnesses said. The single-seat plane, a P-47 Thunderbolt, crashed on a part of the river near where a US Airways commercial jet carrying 155 people splash-landed safely in 2009 in what became known as the Miracle on the Hudson. A witness to the P-47 Thunderbolt crash, Hunter College student Siqi Li, saw smoke spewing from the plane and thought it was doing a trick.


SpaceX lands another rocket after satellite delivery
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) - SpaceX pulled off another rocket landing Friday, the third in just under two months. The first-stage booster of the unmanned Falcon rocket settled vertically onto a barge 400 miles off Florida's east coast, eight minutes after the late afternoon liftoff. Cameras on the barge provided stunning, real-time video. "Falcon 9 has landed!" said a SpaceX flight commentator. The touchdown occurred after the rocket launched an Asian communications satellite. Like the last successful landing, this one was especially difficult given the speed and heat of the incoming 15-story booster. SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk said via Twitter that the rocket's landing speed was close to the design maximum, thus the back and forth motion.


Domestic violence accusations often leave permanent damage
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Fans can be deeply forgiving, willing to look past their favorite star's terrible drug addiction, ugly custody battle or ignorant remarks. But accusations of domestic violence often leave a lasting impression on a celebrity's image. Chris Brown may be winning Grammys, but nobody's forgotten what happened with Rihanna. Globally beloved Johnny Depp will continue to be popular and make millions as a movie star, despite his wife's allegations that he was physically abusive throughout their relationship. But he'll have a permanent edge now that no camera lens can soften. "Johnny Depp was very well-liked by women and I think these accusations are going to stain him," said longtime Hollywood publicist Michael Levine.


AP PHOTOS: A selection of pictures from the past week
Highlights from the weekly AP photo report, a gallery featuring a mix of front-page photography, the odd image you might have missed and lasting moments our editors think you should see. This week's gallery features an Ultra-Orthodox Jewish boy watching a bonfire during a religious celebration in Jerusalem; protesters running from tear gas fired by Iraqi security forces in Baghdad; and people walking through heavy rain during a storm in Cuzco, Peru. --- This gallery contains photos published May 20-May 27, 2016. See the latest AP photo galleries: http://apne.ws/TXeCBN The Archive: Top photo highlights from previous weeks: http://apne.ws/13QUFKJ --- Follow AP photographers on Twitter: http://twitter.com/AP/lists/ap-photographers Follow AP Images on Twitter: http://twitter.com/AP-Images Visit AP Images online: http://www.apimages.com http://www.apimages.com/ --- This gallery was produced by Patrick Sison in New York.


Looking ahead to 100 more years at the Indianapolis 500
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - Ray Harroun never could have envisioned the speed, science and styling behind the cars on the starting grid for the 100th Indy 500, not when he was piloting the Marmon Wasp to victory in the inaugural race back in 1911. His black-and-gold car looked like a battering ram on wheels, rather than the sleek, fighter-jet-like cars of today. Harroun puttered around at an average speed of 74 mph, roughly 160 mph behind the pole-winning speed of James Hinchliffe this year, and he needed nearly 7 hours to complete that first 500-mile race. "In my estimation the limit is reached at 500 miles," Harroun predicted upon exiting the car, "and is entirely too long for the endurance of the driver." Yet they're still racing 500 miles after all these years.