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Official says gunman made 'no more baby parts' comment
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) - The man who police say staged a deadly shooting attack on a Planned Parenthood clinic that offers abortion services said "no more baby parts" after his arrest, a law enforcement official said Saturday. The official could not elaborate about the comment by the 57-year-old suspect, Robert Lewis Dear. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the official was not authorized to speak publicly about the ongoing investigation. Planned Parenthood said late Saturday that witnesses said the gunman was motivated by his opposition to abortion. Police, however, have not disclosed a motive for Friday's attack during which they say Dear stormed the Colorado Springs clinic, killing three people, including a police officer, before he surrendered to authorities.

Pope heads to Central African Republic with peace message
KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) - Pope Francis travels Sunday to Central African Republic, making the final stop of his first trip to Africa in a country where violence between Christian and Muslim militants has forced nearly 1 million from their homes over the last two years and created a divided capital. The precarious security situation in the capital of Bangui had raised the possibility in recent weeks that the pope could cancel his visit. Less than a year ago, mobs were beating Muslims to death in the streets, even decapitating and dismembering their victims. While sectarian clashes have left at least 100 people dead over the last two months, recent days have been relatively free of gunfire.

Images, analysis released of Cleveland officer shooting boy
CLEVELAND (AP) - Prosecutors in Ohio on Saturday released a frame-by-frame analysis of the surveillance camera footage first made public a year ago that shows a white Cleveland police officer fatally shooting a black 12-year-old boy who had a pellet gun. The additional images taken from surveillance video at a recreation center where Tamir Rice was shot and killed don't appear to contain any new or substantive information. The new footage was released in the "spirit of openness," said Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Tim McGinty. The analysis also doesn't show whether Tamir, as police officials have maintained, was reaching into his waistband for the pellet gun when then-rookie patrolman Timothy Loehmann shot him less than two seconds after getting out of the car.

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Attorneys for slain boy's family want own experts to testify
CLEVELAND (AP) - Attorneys for the family of the black 12-year-old boy who was fatally shot by a white Cleveland police officer last year have asked a prosecutor to allow their use-of-force experts to testify before the grand jury. The request follows the release of reports by prosecutors that concluded the shooting was justified because the officers had no way of knowing that Tamir Rice's pellet gun wasn't a real firearm. The family's experts say bad police tactics led to Tamir's death. A consultant notes that police should have better assessed the situation back on November 22, 2014. The consultant also criticizes the prosecutor's experts for assuming that Patrolman Timothy Loehmann warned Tamir to raise his hands before shooting him.

Hamstrung by Congress, Obama tries to clinch climate pact
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama is trying to negotiate a legacy-making climate change pact this coming week in Paris with one hand tied behind his back. Congress can't even agree whether global warming is real. Scientists point to the global agreement, years in the making, as the last, best hope for averting the worst effects of global warming. Obama has spent months prodding other countries to make ambitious carbon-cutting pledges to the agreement, which he hopes will become the framework for countries to tackle the climate issue long beyond the end of his presidency in early 2017. But Republicans have tried to undermine the president by sowing uncertainty about whether the U.S.

More deaths blamed on wintry storm moving through central US
DALLAS (AP) - A slow-moving wintry storm system that has been blamed for more than a dozen deaths began moving eastward out of Texas on Saturday but kept coating some states to the north in ice, making driving dangerous. The band of storms that has been moving through parts of the Plains and the Midwest since Thursday has been blamed for at least 14 deaths, including eight in Texas and six in Kansas. A 70-year-old woman whose car was swept away by flash flooding Friday in Fort Worth remained missing Saturday. Although the icy conditions were expected to persist in parts of Oklahoma and Kansas through the end of Saturday, temperatures on Sunday were expected to be above freezing in the Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles, allowing the region to thaw out, the National Weather Service said.

Carson after tour: Syrian refugees don't want to come to US
AZRAQ REFUGEE CAMP, Jordan (AP) - After touring Syrian refugee camps in Jordan, Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson on Saturday suggested that camps should serve as a long-term solution for millions, while other refugees could be absorbed by Middle Eastern countries. "I did not detect any great desire for them to come to the United States," Carson told The Associated Press in a phone interview from Jordan. "You've got these refugee camps that aren't completely full. And all you need is the resources to be able to run them. Why do you need to create something else?" The retired neurosurgeon toured the Azraq camp in northern Jordan under heavy Jordanian security, with journalists barred.

Putin orders sanctions against Turkey after downing of jet
ANKARA, Turkey (AP) - Russian President Vladimir Putin on Saturday called for sanctions against Turkey, following the downing this week by Turkey of a Russian warplane. The decree published on the Kremlin's website Saturday came hours after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan had voiced regret over the incident, saying his country was "truly saddened" by the event and wished it hadn't occurred. It includes a ban on some goods and forbids extensions of labor contracts for Turks working in Russia as of Jan. 1. It doesn't specify what goods are to be banned or give other details, but it also calls for ending chartered flights from Russia to Turkey and for Russian tourism companies to stop selling vacation packages that would include a stay in Turkey.

Black Friday store sales fall as Americans buy more online
WASHINGTON (AP) - Black Friday shopping is shifting from hours spent in line to more time online. Sales at retail stores on Black Friday fell to $10.4 billion this year, down from $11.6 billion in 2014, according to preliminary figures from research firm ShopperTrak. And sales on Thanksgiving dropped to $1.8 billion from just over $2 billion. ShopperTrak has 1,200 members, including retailers and malls, in the U.S and overseas. Their figures don't include e-commerce. A big reason for the declines is increased online shopping, as Americans hunt down deals on their smartphones, tablets and computers. Another key factor: Many retailers are offering bargains long before Thanksgiving, limiting the impact of Black Friday specials.

No. 13 Stanford rallies past No. 4 Notre Dame 38-36
STANFORD, Calif. (AP) - Kevin Hogan put quite a capper on his Stanford career on senior day. Hogan threw four touchdown passes and drove the 13th-ranked Cardinal to the winning 45-yard field goal by Conrad Ukropina on the last play of a 38-36 victory over No. 4 Notre Dame in a playoff elimination game Saturday night. Hogan threw for 269 yards and calmly led the winning drive in the final 30 seconds for the Cardinal (10-2, No. 9 CFP), who kept their slim playoff hopes alive with the win. Stanford needs to beat Southern California in the Pac-12 championship game next week and then get help in the other title games to make the four-team playoff.