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AP Top News at 4:19 a.m. EDT

Not in my backyard: US sending dirty coal abroad
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (AP) - As the Obama administration weans the U.S. off dirty fuels blamed for global warming, energy companies have been sending more of America's unwanted energy leftovers to other parts of the world where they could create even more pollution. This fossil fuel trade threatens to undermine President Barack Obama's strategy for reducing the gases blamed for climate change and reveals a little-discussed side effect of countries acting alone on a global problem. The contribution of this exported pollution to global warming is not something the administration wants to measure, or even talk about.


5 things to know about coal trade, global warming
As the Obama administration weans the U.S. off polluting fuels blamed for global warming, energy companies have been sending more of America's unwanted energy leftovers to other parts of the world where they could create even more pollution. Here are five things to know about the issue: 1. AS U.S. REDUCES COAL USE, DEMAND RISES GLOBALLY. Over the past six years, the U.S. has cut consumption by 195 million tons as power plants have burned cheaper natural gas instead. The Environmental Protection Agency's latest proposal would further cut coal's share of electricity generation. Meanwhile, coal demand is rising globally. In 2013, according to the 2014 BP Statistical Review of World Energy, it grew by 3 percent. The International Energy Agency expects global coal demand to grow 2.3 percent per year through 2018.


Relative lull in Gaza as UN calls for cease-fire
JERUSALEM (AP) - A relative lull descended on the war-torn Gaza Strip at the start of a major Muslim holiday on Monday, as international efforts intensified to end the three-week war between Israel and Hamas and the U.N. called for an "immediate" cease-fire. The calm came as Muslims started celebrating the Eid al-Fitr holiday marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan.


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Reporter recalls Soviet evasion in '83 jet downing
Those searching for the truth about what happened in the shoot-down of the Malaysia airliner over Ukraine can take little comfort from the history of another passenger jet that was blasted out of the sky over the Soviet Union more than three decades ago: The Kremlin at the time dodged, weaved and obfuscated. Today, we still don't know what exactly happened to Korean Airlines Flight 007. I was The Associated Press' Moscow bureau chief when a Soviet Sukhoi-15 fighter downed KAL 007 on Sept. 1, 1983. The passenger plane was about to leave Soviet airspace after more than two hours of flying off-course above super-secret military installations along the Pacific coast. Pilots on the New York to Seoul flight via Anchorage, Alaska, had apparently put wrong navigation points into the on-flight computer. All 269 people on board were killed.


Chinese police remove church cross amid crackdown
BEIJING (AP) - Hundreds of police took down a church's cross Monday in a city known as "China's Jerusalem" for its many houses of worship amid a crackdown on church buildings in a coastal region where thousands of people are embracing Christianity. Evangelist Qu Linuo said he and about 200 others had rushed to the Longgang Huai En Church in the eastern city of Wenzhou to protect the building but peacefully made way for the police, who used a crane to remove the 3-meter-tall (10-foot-tall) red cross from its steeple.


Analysis: Clinton drama hangs over GOP lawsuit
WASHINGTON (AP) - The last time Republicans unleashed impeachment proceedings against a Democratic president, they lost five House seats in an election they seemed primed to win handily. Memories of Bill Clinton and the campaign of 1998 may help explain why Speaker John Boehner and the current GOP leadership want no part of such talk now, although conservatives increasingly clamor for it. And also why President Barack Obama's White House seems almost eager to stir the impeachment pot three months before mid-term elections.


Virus drugmaker fights pediatricians' new advice
CHICAGO (AP) - A costly drug given mostly to premature babies is at the center of a clash between the manufacturer and the nation's leading pediatrician's group, which recommends scaling back use of the medicine. The dispute involves new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics, which say medical evidence shows the drug benefits few children other than very young preemies. The medicine guards against a common but usually mild virus that can cause serious lung problems.


Kevin Bacon brings his 'Six Degrees' to Comic-Con
SAN DIEGO (AP) - Kevin Bacon's "Six Degrees" world got even bigger Sunday at Comic-Con. During a Sunday panel for his Fox show "The Following," a fan brought up the pop culture game known as "Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon," whose premise is anyone in Hollywood can be linked to the actor. She wondered if by talking to him she could then be a part of his universe.


Police investigate deaths of family of 5 in Maine
SACO, Maine (AP) - Neighbors struggled to make sense of the shooting deaths of a family of five in which the father was known to many throughout their apartment complex as a friendly maintenance worker. Three children ranging from 4 to 12 were among the victims discovered Sunday in their home along with a long-barreled gun believed to have been used in their deaths. A detective said murder-suicide was one of the scenarios being investigated.


The Big Hurt and Joe Torre headline HOF class
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP) - Frank Thomas choked back tears, Joe Torre apologized for leaving people out of his speech and Tony La Russa said he felt uneasy. Being enshrined in the Hall of Fame can have those effects, even on the greats.

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