Winston-Salem Journal: Ap

AP Top News at 3:21 a.m. EDT

The Latest: Car strikes 2 women watching eclipse, 1 dies
Authorities say two women watching the eclipse while standing on a sidewalk in Kentucky were struck by a car, and one has died. State Police Trooper Jody Sims says the car crossed the center line and hit a utility pole and the pedestrians Monday in Hyden, about 120 miles (190 kilometers) southeast of Lexington. Sims says 23-year-old Mackenzie P. Hays was pronounced dead, and 41-year-old Rhonda Belcher was flown to the University of Kentucky Hospital in Lexington. Thirty-eight-year-old motorist Alyssa Noble was taken to a medical center. The condition of Wooton and Noble weren't immediately known. State Police Capt. Jennifer Sandlin confirmed the pedestrians were viewing the partial eclipse.


Trump commits US to fight on in Afghanistan; no speedy exit
WASHINGTON (AP) - Reversing his past calls for a speedy exit, President Donald Trump recommitted the United States to the 16-year-old war in Afghanistan Monday night, declaring U.S. troops must "fight to win." He pointedly declined to disclose how many more troops will be dispatched to wage America's longest war. In a prime-time address to unveil his new Afghanistan strategy, Trump said the U.S. would shift away from a "time-based" approach, instead linking its assistance to results and to cooperation from the beleaguered Afghan government, Pakistan and others. He insisted it would be a "regional" strategy that addressed the roles played by other South Asian nations - especially Pakistan's harboring of elements of the Taliban.


Analysis: Trump vows to win the seemingly unwinnable war
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump is vowing to win what has seemed to be an unwinnable war. How he plans to do so is still murky despite the months of internal deliberations that ultimately persuaded Trump to stick with a conflict he has long opposed. In a 26-minute address to the nation Monday, Trump alluded to more American troops deploying to Afghanistan, but refused to say how many. He said victory would be well-defined, but outlined only vague benchmarks for success, like dismantling al-Qaida and preventing the Taliban from taking over Afghanistan. He said the U.S. would not offer Afghanistan a "blank check," but provided no specific timetable for the end of an American commitment that has already lasted 16 years.


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Divers search McCain's flooded compartments for 10 sailors
SINGAPORE (AP) - Navy and Marine Corps divers will enter flooded compartments on the USS John S. McCain to search for 10 sailors missing after the destroyer and an oil tanker collided in Southeast Asian waters, the 7th Fleet said Tuesday. The sea search by aircraft and ships from the U.S., Singapore and Malaysian navies will continue east of Singapore where the McCain and the tanker collided at daybreak Monday, the 7th Fleet said, but the shift of focus to the McCain itself is a blow to families still hoping for a miracle. "Equipped with surface supplied air rigs, divers will access sealed compartments located in damaged parts of the ship" the fleet said in a statement announcing that divers had joined the search.


Mattis: IS militants caught in Iraq-Syria military vise
BAGHDAD (AP) - Expelled from their main stronghold in northern Iraq, Islamic State militants are now trapped in a military vise that will squeeze them on both sides of the Syria-Iraq border, U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said. Mattis arrived in the Iraqi capital on an unannounced visit Tuesday just hours after President Donald Trump outlined a fresh approach to the stalemated war in Afghanistan. Trump also has vowed to take a more aggressive, effective approach against IS in Iraq and Syria, but he has yet to unveil a strategy for that conflict that differs greatly from his predecessor's. In Baghdad, Mattis was meeting with senior Iraqi government leaders and with U.S.


NKorea issues trademark fiery rhetoric over US-SKorea drills
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - North Korea's military on Tuesday greeted the start of annual U.S.-South Korean military drills with its standard fiery threats, vowing "merciless retaliation" for exercises Pyongyang claims are an invasion rehearsal. North Korea routinely issues such warlike rhetoric or conducts weapons tests to respond to the U.S.-South Korean exercises. Tuesday's threat came as top U.S. generals, including Adm. Harry Harris, the commander of U.S. forces in the Pacific, visited South Korea. Ties between the Koreas are almost always fraught, but anxiety is higher than normal following weeks of tit-for-tat threats between President Donald Trump and Pyongyang in the wake of the North's two intercontinental ballistic missile tests last month.


Officials: 33 people injured in train crash at station
UPPER DARBY, Pa. (AP) - More than 30 people were injured when a train crashed into another train that was parked at a station in suburban Philadelphia. The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority said the crash happened around 12:15 a.m. Tuesday. An inbound Norristown High Speed Line train crashed into an unoccupied, parked train at the 69th Street Terminal in Upper Darby, said SEPTA spokeswoman Heather Redfern. SEPTA said 33 people aboard the train were injured. In an early morning news briefing, Upper Darby Mayor Nicholas Micozzie said at least four people suffered serious injuries. The victims were taken to area hospitals.


Anger over rally violence boils over in Charlottesville
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) - Anger boiled over at the first Charlottesville City Council meeting since a white nationalist rally in the city descended into violent chaos, with some residents screaming and cursing at councilors Monday night and calling for their resignations. Scores of people packed the council's chambers, and The Daily Progress reported Mayor Mike Signer was interrupted by shouting several times in the first few minutes of the meeting. As tensions escalated, the meeting was halted. Live video showed protesters standing on a dais with a sign that said, "Blood on your hands." After talking with members of the crowd, Councilor Wes Bellamy said the council would drop its agenda and focus on the crowd's concerns, the newspaper reported.


Police: Fugitive's death 'breaks' cell behind Spain attacks
SUBIRATS, Spain (AP) - The lone fugitive from the Spanish cell that killed 15 people in and near Barcelona was shot to death Monday after he flashed what turned out to be a fake suicide belt at two troopers who confronted him in a vineyard not far from the city he terrorized, authorities said. Police said they had "scientific evidence" that Younes Abouyaaqoub, 22, drove the van that barreled through Barcelona's crowded Las Ramblas promenade, killing 13 people on Thursday, then hijacked a car and fatally stabbed its driver while making his getaway. Abouyaaqoub's brother and friends made up the rest of the 12-man extremist cell, along with an imam who was one of two people killed in what police said was a botched bomb-making operation.


Chile families fight for acceptance of transgender children
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) - Monica Flores was returning from a holiday abroad when Chilean police stopped her for questions at the airport. They were bothered that their records didn't match: She had left the country with a son and returned with a daughter. Flores had to explain that her 6-year-old registered as a boy identifies as a girl. "It was a distressing moment. I realized that it was urgent that the different institutions of our country could be trained about trans issues to avoid having children undergo these questionings," Flores said. The uncomfortable incident two years ago, led Flores and her husband to launch a legal battle for the rights of their daughter - a struggle that has encouraged the families of other trans children to demand greater acceptance and that has fed the broader debate about gender rights in a country so socially conservative that it legalized divorce just 13 years ago.