AP WIRE: NEWS

AP Top News at 8:35 p.m. EDT

Clinton says veep pick Kaine is everything GOP ticket isn't
MIAMI (AP) - Hillary Clinton debuted running mate Sen. Tim Kaine on Saturday as a can-do progressive committed to social justice and equality - "everything Donald Trump and Mike Pence are not" - at a boisterous rally ahead of next week's Democratic National Convention. "He is qualified to step into this job and lead from Day One. And he is a progressive who likes to get things done," Clinton declared at Florida International University. Kaine, a bilingual former Virginia governor, detailed his life in public service. "I like to fight for right," he said. And, as Clinton smiled broadly at her choice for vice president, Kaine greeted the largely Hispanic audience in Spanish.


The Latest: Sanders delegates assured they won't miss votes
The Bernie Sanders campaign is assuring its delegates they will not miss votes if they attend a private meeting with him before the start of the Democratic National Convention. A text message Saturday to Sanders' 1,900 delegates says they should "not worry about being in the convention hall for the opening gavel." It adds that if delegates arrive too early, they "will have nothing to do for hours." Delegates have been expressing concerns about the meeting because it's being held at 2 p.m. Monday, miles away from the Wells Fargo Center. The convention was originally slated to start at 3 p.m., but the DNC says the time has been changed to 4 p.m.


How Hillary Clinton chose Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine as her VP
MIAMI (AP) - Hillary Clinton's search for a vice president started with a commanding victory in the New York primary and a special delivery in a plastic Duane Reade bag. Three months later, it ended with a phone call to a shipyard office, where Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine was waiting. From the start, Kaine was a front-runner to join Clinton on the Democratic ticket. A senator, former Virginia governor and mayor of Richmond, he hails from a top battleground state and, as a fluent Spanish speaker, could help in another: Florida. Victories in both would likely put the White House out of the reach of Donald Trump and his running mate, Indiana Gov.


Watch Top News Video




Energized white supremacists cheer Trump convention message
CLEVELAND (AP) - They don't like to be called white supremacists. The well-dressed men who gathered in Cleveland's Ritz-Carlton bar after Donald Trump's speech accepting the Republican nomination for president prefer the term "Europeanists," ''alt-right," or even "white nationalists." They are also die-hard Trump supporters. And far from hiding in chat rooms or under white sheets, they cheered the GOP presidential nominee from inside the Republican National Convention over the last week. While not official delegates, they nevertheless obtained credentials to attend the party's highest-profile quadrennial gathering. Several gathered in the luxury hotel well after midnight following Trump's Thursday address, a fiery appeal they said helped push the Republican Party closer to their principles.


Police: Munich suspect was obsessed with mass shootings
MUNICH (AP) - The gunman whose rampage at a Munich mall left nine people dead was a depression-plagued teenager who avidly read books and articles about mass killings and apparently tried to lure young victims to their deaths through a faked Facebook posting, authorities said Saturday. Information from witnesses indicated that his hatred of foreigners might have played a role in the mass shooting, even though he himself was the German-born son of Iranian asylum-seekers. Most of the dead were youths and all were Munich residents of varied ethnic backgrounds. Hueseyin Bayri, who witnessed one boy's death, told The Associated Press the shooter screamed a profanity about foreigners and said "I will kill you all" as he pulled the trigger.


IS attacks protest in Afghan capital, kills 80 people
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) - The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing on a peaceful protest in the Afghan capital on Saturday that killed at least 80 people and wounded more than 200, marking the first time the extremists have struck Kabul and raising fears of their growing strength and capability in Afghanistan. The attack was the deadliest to hit Kabul in 15 years of civil war. It struck a demonstration by Afghanistan's Hazara ethnic community, who were marching for a major regional power line to be routed through their home province. The Hazaras are Shiite Muslims, most Afghans are Sunnis.


Internal reviews underway for officers in police death case
BALTIMORE (AP) - Under the beating summer sun, retired steelworker Arthur B. Johnson Jr. stood outside the Clarence Mitchell Courthouse in Baltimore, clutching the fraying wooden handle of a homemade sign. "Justice for Freddie Gray," it read. Inside, a fourth officer was about to be cleared of criminal charges in Gray's death last April, a week after Gray's neck was broken while he was handcuffed and shackled but left unrestrained in the back of a police van. Johnson has shown up for every trial, in pouring rain and sweltering heat. Thousands took to the streets last spring. The refrain of "No justice, no peace" rang through corridors on the city's east and west sides for more than a week; after a riot broke out, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake instituted a 10 p.m.


Boy Scouts faring well a year after easing ban on gay adults
NEW YORK (AP) - There were dire warnings for the Boy Scouts of America a year ago when the group's leaders, under intense pressure, voted to end a long-standing blanket ban on participation by openly gay adults. Several of the biggest sponsors of Scout units, including the Roman Catholic, Mormon and Southern Baptist churches, were openly dismayed, raising the prospect of mass defections. Remarkably, nearly 12 months after the BSA National Executive Board's decision, the Boy Scouts seem more robust than they have in many years. Youth membership is on the verge of stabilizing after a prolonged decline, corporations which halted donations because of the ban have resumed their support, and the vast majority of units affiliated with conservative religious denominations have remained in the fold - still free to exclude gay adults if that's in accordance with their religious doctrine.


AP Poll: Support grows among Americans for stricter gun laws
Americans increasingly favor tougher gun laws by margins that have grown wider after a steady drumbeat of shootings in recent months, but they also are pessimistic that change will happen anytime soon, according to a new Associated Press-GfK poll. Nearly two-thirds of respondents expressed support for stricter laws, with majorities favoring nationwide bans on the sale of semi-automatic assault weapons such as the AR-15 and on the sale of high-capacity magazines holding 10 or more bullets. The percentage of Americans who want such laws is the highest since the AP-GfK poll started asking the question in 2013, a survey taken about 10 months after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, that killed 20 children and six educators.


WNBA withdraws fines for teams that wore black warmup shirts
NEW YORK (AP) - The WNBA is withdrawing its fines for teams and players that showed support of citizens and police involved in recent shootings by wearing black warmup shirts before and during games. WNBA President Lisa Borders said in a statement Saturday the league was rescinding penalties given to the Indiana Fever, New York Liberty, Phoenix Mercury and their players for wearing the shirts - which was a uniform violation. The players started wearing them to show solidarity after shootings in Minnesota and Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Each team was fined $5,000 and players were each given a $500 penalty because WNBA rules stated that uniforms may not be altered in any way.

ADVERTISEMENTS