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AP Top News at 3:48 p.m. EDT

Brazil's Rousseff faces senators, says accusations meritless
BRASILIA, Brazil (AP) - Fighting to save her job, suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff told senators on Monday that the allegations against her have no merit and that history would judge the country if she is removed from office. "I know I will be judged, but my conscience is clear. I did not commit a crime," Rousseff told senators at her impeachment trial. Rousseff reminded senators that she was re-elected in 2014 by more than 54 million voters. She said that at every moment she has followed the constitution and done what was best for the country. "I can't help but taste the bitterness of injustice" of this process, she said.


Police detain man dressed as Zorro just before airport panic
LOS ANGELES (AP) - A false report of gunshots that sent panicked travelers fleeing from Los Angeles International Airport came right after officers with weapons drawn detained a masked man dressed in black and possibly carrying a plastic sword, officials said. Soon after, hundreds of passengers raced onto streets or the tarmac, causing major flight delays that the airport was still recovering from Monday. Video shows at least six officers confronting the man dressed as the fictional crime fighter Zorro outside Terminal 7 around 8:40 p.m. Sunday. Investigators were focusing on what prompted the first of several 911 that came from multiple terminals, airport police Officer Rob Pedregon said Monday.


Trump plans major ad buy after weeks of being outspent
WASHINGTON (AP) - Donald Trump's campaign is making its biggest general election ad buy to date, with plans to spend upward of $10 million on commercials airing over the next week or so. The campaign is expecting to air a new ad, which paints rival Hillary Clinton as a job-killer, as soon as Monday in nine states: Ohio, Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Florida, where the campaign has already been on the air, along with New Hampshire, Virginia, Iowa, Colorado and Nevada - all battleground states. Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, has so far been badly outspent by his Democratic rival and groups supporting her.


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Clinton proposes plan to address mental health treatment
SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) - Hillary Clinton rolled out a comprehensive plan to address millions of Americans coping with mental illness, pointing to the need to fully integrate mental health services into the nation's health care system. Clinton's campaign released a multi-pronged approach to mental health care on Monday, aimed at ensuring that Americans would no longer separate mental health from physical health in terms of access, care and quality of treatment. "We've got to break through and break down the stigma and shame. We've got to make clear that mental health is not a personal failing. Right now it's our country which is failing people with mental health issues," she said.


Nephew: Gene Wilder, star of Mel Brooks movies, dies at 83
Gene Wilder, the star of such comedy classics as "Young Frankenstein" and "Blazing Saddles," has died. He was 83. Wilder's nephew said Monday that the actor and writer died late Sunday in Stamford, Connecticut from complications from Alzheimer's disease. The frizzy-haired actor was a master at playing panicked characters caught up in schemes that only a madman such as Mel Brooks could devise, whether reviving a monster in "Young Frankenstein" or bilking Broadway in "The Producers." But he also knew how to keep it cool as the boozy sheriff in "Blazing Saddles" and as the charming candy man in the children's favorite "Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory."


Weiner's wife is leaving him amid a new sexting scandal
NEW YORK (AP) - Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin said Monday that she is leaving her husband, Anthony Weiner, after the former New York congressman was accused in yet another sexting scandal. "After long and painful consideration and work on my marriage, I have made the decision to separate from my husband," Abedin, vice chair of Clinton's presidential campaign, said in a statement issued by the campaign. "Anthony and I remain devoted to doing what is best for our son, who is the light of our life." The New York Post published photos late Sunday that it said Weiner, a Democrat, had sent last year to a woman.


Quake survivors erupt in anger at funeral plan; govt relents
ROME (AP) - Italian quake survivors rebelled in anger Monday over the government's plan to hold a state funeral for their loved ones in an airport hangar in a distant town, where scores of bodies are being kept in refrigerated trucks, and let them watch it on screens from near their emergency tent camp. One relative of 7-year-old twins who perished in central Italy's Aug. 24 quake was so upset by the announcement he could barely speak, holding up seven fingers when explaining how old the children were. The mayor of Amatrice, the hardest-hit of the three medieval towns flattened by the quake, was also upset.


FAA forecast: 600,000 commercial drones within the year
WASHINGTON (AP) - There will be 600,000 commercial drone aircraft operating in the U.S. within the year as the result of new safety rules that opened the skies to them on Monday, according to a Federal Aviation Administration estimate. The rules governing the operation of small commercial drones were designed to protect safety without stifling innovation, FAA Administrator Michael Huerta told a news conference. Commercial operators initially complained that the new rules would be too rigid. The agency responded by creating a system to grant exemptions to some of the rules for companies that show they can operate safely, Huerta said.


2 slain nuns remembered for 'Christian love in action'
DURANT, Miss. (AP) - Hundreds of people filled a cathedral in Mississippi's capital city on Monday to remember two nuns who spent decades helping the needy and were found stabbed to death last week in their home in one of the poorest counties of the state. An initial court appearance was scheduled to take place hours later for the man charged with two counts of capital murder in the slayings of Sisters Margaret Held and Paula Merrill, both 68. It was not immediately clear whether Rodney Earl Sanders, 46, of Kosciusko, Mississippi, would be represented by an attorney during his appearance Monday afternoon in Durant city court.


Did fall from tree kill famous human ancestor Lucy?
LOS ANGELES (AP) - The famous human ancestor known as Lucy walked the Earth, but it was her tree climbing that might have led to her demise, a new study suggests. An analysis of her partial skeleton reveals breaks in her right arm, left shoulder, right ankle and left knee - injuries that researchers say resulted from falling from a high perch such as a tree. Lucy likely died quickly, said John Kappelman, an anthropologist at the University of Texas at Austin, who published the findings Monday in the journal Nature. "I don't think she suffered," Kappelman said. But several other researchers, including Lucy's discoverer, disagree.