AP Top News at 11:05 a.m. EST

Experts: Clinton email practices risked data disclosures
WASHINGTON (AP) - Hillary Rodham Clinton's use of a private email address and private computer server for official State Department business heightened security risks to her communications, such as the inadvertent disclosure of sensitive information and the danger from hackers, several information security experts said. The revelation that Clinton relied exclusively on a private email account for routine exchanges during her four-year stint as secretary of state also raises questions about whether the agency or anyone else in government examined Clinton's private email server and network before it began operating and continued to regularly review it during her tenure. Federal regulations subject the computer systems of some federal contractors and other organizations to federal oversight when they interact with government systems to ensure they are protected.


Source: Obama counsel not aware of Clinton's email practice
WASHINGTON (AP) - The White House counsel's office was not aware at the time Hillary Rodham Clinton was secretary of state that she relied solely on personal email and only found out as part of the congressional investigation into the Benghazi attack, according to a person familiar with the matter. The person said Clinton's exclusive reliance on personal email as the nation's top diplomat was inconsistent with the guidance given to agencies that official business should be conducted on official email accounts. Once the State Department turned over some of her messages in connection with the Benghazi investigation after she left office, making it apparent she had not followed the guidance, the White House counsel's office asked the department to ensure that her email records were properly archived, according to the person who spoke on a condition of anonymity without authorization to speak on the record.


Fate of Obama health law subsidies rests with 2 justices
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court argument over subsidies that help millions of people afford their health insurance suggests that the Obama administration has two chances to attract one critical vote. The justices will gather in private Friday to cast their votes in the case. The outcome after Wednesday's argument appears to be in the hands of two conservative justices - one who voted with the court's four liberals to uphold the law in 2012 and the other who joins the liberals more often, but who would have killed the whole thing three years ago.


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Ringling Bros. phasing out iconic elephant acts by 2018
POLK CITY, Fla. (AP) - The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus will phase out the show's iconic elephants from its performances by 2018, telling The Associated Press exclusively that growing public concern about how the animals are treated led to the decision. Executives from Feld Entertainment, Ringling's parent company, said the decision to end the circus's century-old tradition of showcasing elephants was difficult and debated at length. Elephants have often been featured on Ringling's posters over the decades. The decision is being announced Thursday.


Kerry seeks to ease Arab concerns of Iran deal
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) - U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry sought Thursday to ease Gulf Arab concerns about an emerging nuclear deal with Iran and vowed that any agreement reached would not reduce America's commitment to combating Tehran's destabilizing actions in the Middle East and beyond. Speaking at a news conference in Riyadh with Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal, Kerry said a nuclear agreement would not be part of a "grand bargain" with Iran and that the United States would continue to fully support its partners in the Gulf against Iranian interference.


US finds racist, profit-driven practices in Ferguson
ST. LOUIS (AP) - A federal investigation into the police killing of an unarmed, black 18-year-old in Ferguson, Missouri, lays bare what officials contend are racist, profit-driven law enforcement practices in the small St. Louis suburb. While the Department of Justice cleared Officer Darren Wilson of federal civil rights charges in the August death of Michael Brown, it also called for sweeping changes in a city where officers trade racist emails, issue tickets mostly to black drivers that generate millions of dollars in revenue, and routinely use what investigators called excessive force on people stopped for minor or non-existent offenses.


Judge nixes motion to limit bomb survivors' grisly testimony
BOSTON (AP) - Prosecutors in the Boston Marathon bombing trial quickly conveyed the sense of fear, pain and grief caused by the 2013 attack - by letting the victims do it for them. It was too much for the defense. Lawyers for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev complained to the judge Thursday that the survivors' testimony was too gruesome and should be limited in the future.


Ex-crew recognizes photos of sunken Japanese battleship
TOKYO (AP) - A former crewmember on a Japanese battleship that sank during World War II said Thursday he recognized photos of wreckage discovered this week off the Philippines by a team led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. Shizuhiko Haraguchi served as a gunnery officer on the Musashi, one of the largest battleships in history, when it was being fitted in Japan before it departed for the Pacific in 1943.


6 patients, 6 donors prepare for rare kidney swap chain
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - In a rare series of interlinked operations, six patients are getting kidney transplants from six donors at a San Francisco hospital. Dr. William Bry, a surgeon at California Pacific Medical Center, said the "kidney paired donations" are occurring thanks to a woman who started a chain of donations and a computer program that matches donors to recipients, KGO-TV reported Wednesday (http://abc7ne.ws/1B5bshp ).


Coach's adopted toddler builds a life with hoops team
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) - Joanne Boyle offered a quick prayer before clicking the photo link of a days-old girl in a Senegalese orphanage. Maybe, after so many years of waiting, this would be the child the Virginia women's basketball coach could bring home. The fuzzy picture popped up on her laptop. Staring back at her from a world away was a close-up of little Ngoty, blanket around her.