Daily Tribune

 LATEST NEWS
 Top Stories
 Iraq
 South Asia Quake
 Hurricane Wilma
 U.S.
 World
 Business
 Personal Finance
 Technology
 Sports
 Entertainment
 Health
 Science
 Politics
 Washington
 Offbeat
 Weather
 Raw News
 NEWS SEARCH
 
 Text Archive
 SPECIAL SECTIONS
 Multimedia Gallery
 News Summary
 (AUDIO)
 News Summary
 (VIDEO)
 Today
 in History
 Video Gallery
 Photo Gallery
 PhotoWeek
 SportsWeek
 U.S. Census
 Database
 U.S. Crime
 Database
 Corrections
AP Top News at 4:20 p.m. EDT

Train crashes at New Jersey station; 1 dead, 74 hospitalized
HOBOKEN, N.J. (AP) - A rush-hour commuter train crashed through a barrier at the busy Hoboken station and lurched across the waiting area Thursday morning, killing one person and injuring more than 100 others in a tangle of broken concrete, twisted metal and dangling wires. People pulled chunks of concrete off pinned and bleeding victims, passengers kicked out windows and crawled to safety, and cries and screams could be heard in the wreckage at the station just across the Hudson River from New York City as emergency workers tried to reach trapped victims. The New Jersey Transit train ran off the end of its track as it pulled into the station, smashing through a concrete-and-steel bumper.


Clinton struggling to win over the young voters she needs
BOULDER, Colo. (AP) - John Morales was interning for Bernie Sanders' campaign when the longshot Democratic candidate's hopes started to fade in the spring. That's when Libertarian Gary Johnson caught his interest. In many ways Johnson and Sanders are ideological opposites. The Vermont senator is an opponent of foreign trade deals and won over many younger voters in the primaries by calling for enormous government spending to guarantee universal health care and free college tuition. Johnson, the former New Mexico governor, supports smaller government and the Trans-Pacific Partnership. But he shares Sanders' outsider, tell-it-like-it-is style, social liberalism and skepticism about military intervention overseas - attributes that have won over enough Sanders supporters to worry Democrats he could jeopardize Hillary Clinton's chances in November.


Brain freeze? Gary Johnson can't name favorite world leader
WASHINGTON (AP) - Call it a brain freeze or another "Aleppo moment," but Gary Johnson has stumbled again in his quixotic presidential campaign. The third-party candidate, in a television appearance Wednesday, was unable to produce the name of a single foreign leader he respected. Prodded to come up with something, he finally settled on a former president of Mexico - but couldn't recall his name. "I guess I'm having an Aleppo moment," Johnson said, referencing an episode earlier this month in which he ridiculed when he came up blank when questioned about the besieged city that has become a focal point of Syria's civil war.


Watch Top News Video




Clinton presses early voting in bid to boost Dem turnout
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - With early voting poised to play a bigger role in this year's election, Hillary Clinton was urging voters in Iowa to start casting ballots on Thursday, more than five weeks before Election Day. Clinton's 10-city tour of Iowa brought the Democratic presidential nominee back to a state where she eked out a win in the caucuses over Bernie Sanders. With her focus now on defeating Donald Trump, Clinton was hoping that an emphasis on early voting could help her replicate President Barack Obama's successful strategy in the battleground state four years ago. For Clinton, the early voting strategy is key to any prospects she may have for pulling off victories in states like Arizona and Georgia, which traditionally vote Republican in presidential races.


Russia accuses US of nurturing aggressive nuclear strategy
MOSCOW (AP) - Amid the widening U.S.-Russian spat over Syria, the Russian Foreign Ministry on Thursday issued a strongly-worded statement accusing the Pentagon of nurturing an aggressive nuclear strategy threatening Russia. The ministry cast a recent speech by U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter as a veiled threat to back a hypothetical attack on Russia by its allies in Europe with U.S. nuclear weapons. The angry statement reflects a growing degree of mistrust and tensions between Moscow and Washington after the collapse of a U.S.-Russian cease-fire deal in Syria. On Monday, Carter accused Russia of "nuclear saber-rattling" and argued that even though the Cold War is long over, nuclear weapons are still needed to deter Russia and other potential aggressors from thinking they could get away with a nuclear attack.


Russia accuses US of siding with 'terrorists' in Syria
MOSCOW (AP) - Russian officials accused the U.S. on Thursday of siding with "terrorists" in Syria, in a sign of escalating tensions between Moscow and Washington amid the battle for the northern Syrian city of Aleppo. U.S. State Department spokesman John Kirby's warning that the collapse of U.S.-Russian cooperation in Syria could lead to a rise in extremism and potential attacks against Russia drew Moscow's anger. The Russian Foreign and Defense Ministries both cast it as U.S. encouragement of terror attacks on Russia. "We can't assess those statements as anything else but a call, a directive for action," Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said at a briefing.


More than another call: Chief talks about school shooting
TOWNVILLE, S.C. (AP) - When two firefighters rolled up to an elementary school shooting, they said they found only a wrecked black pickup truck at the playground. There was no gunman, and no one inside the truck. Within minutes, though, they performed actions that led to them being hailed as heroes: One went inside to help treat the wounded and the other searched for the shooter. "This was more than just another call to us. This incident occurred in the school where our children and the children of the community attend," Townville Fire Chief Billy McAdams said Thursday during a news conference, pausing to collect himself as he recalled the harrowing events of the day before.


UN warns of 'merciless abyss' in besieged eastern Aleppo
BEIRUT (AP) - Syrian government forces continued their push into rebel-held districts of Aleppo Thursday as international officials issued dire warnings of an ongoing humanitarian disaster in Syria's largest city. The U.N.'s humanitarian chief Stephen O'Brien told the Security Council that the conditions in eastern Aleppo, which is besieged and assaulted by all sides by government forces, had descended into the "merciless abyss of humanitarian catastrophe." Speaking to the Security Council via video link from Geneva, O'Brien painted a grim picture of the conditions in the war-wracked eastern part of the city, where at least 320 civilians including 100 children have been killed in the past week.


Why is Chicago a murder capital? Clues from a bloody month
CHICAGO (AP) - Fourteen-year-old Malik Causey loved the way gangs took what they wanted from people on the street, the way members fought for each other, the way they could turn drugs into cash and cash into $400 jeans. His mother tried to stop him. She yanked him out of houses where he didn't belong. She cooked up a story about Malik punching her so the police would lock him up to keep him safe for a while. Then on Aug. 21, Monique Causey woke to discover that her son had sneaked out of the house. Before she could find him, someone ended his life with a bullet to the back of his head a few blocks away.


Israel pays respects to Peres as leaders arrive for funeral
JERUSALEM (AP) - Thousands of Israelis flocked to parliament Thursday to view the casket of Shimon Peres, paying final respects to the former president and prime minister whose life story mirrored that of his country. Dignitaries began arriving for a funeral that is expected to be Israel's largest since that of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, Peres' partner in peace who was slain by a Jewish nationalist in 1995. Peres' office said more than 90 delegations from 70 countries have confirmed their participation, including U.S. President Barack Obama, French President Francois Hollande, German President Joachim Gauck, Prince Charles of Britain and King Felipe VI of Spain.