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AP Top News at 9:53 a.m. EDT

Clinton to nation: It's a 'moment of reckoning'
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Hillary Clinton capped a four-day convention celebration with a plea for national unity and tolerance. Now, one of the most divisive and distrusted figures in American politics must convince voters that she, rather than Republican rival Donald Trump, can bring a deeply divided nation together. "America is once again at a moment of reckoning. Powerful forces are threatening to pull us apart," Clinton said to a rapt Democratic convention audience. "And just as with our founders, there are no guarantees. It truly is up to us. We have to decide whether we all will work together so we all can rise together."


AP FACT CHECK: Misfires in Hillary Clinton's speech
WASHINGTON (AP) - In her speech accepting the Democratic nomination, Hillary Clinton wrongly implied Donald Trump has proposed banning Islam in America and sketched out a plan for defeating Islamic State militants that merely mirrors what the U.S. is already trying to do. Clinton spoke Thursday night to the largest TV audience she is likely to have until the presidential debates, meaning many Americans were probably hearing of her agenda for the first time. Although she brings plenty of policy detail when stacked against the broad-brush ideas of her Republican rival, in some cases there's less than meets the eye to what she says she will do.


Father of fallen Muslim soldier blasts Trump at convention
WASHINGTON (AP) - The father of a Muslim American soldier killed in Iraq posed a question to Donald Trump: Have you read the Constitution? To rapturous cheers, Pakistan-born Khizr Khan fiercely attacked the billionaire businessman Thursday at the Democratic convention in Philadelphia, saying that if it were up to Trump, his son never would have been American or served in the military. Khan said that Hillary Clinton, by contrast, "called my son the best of America." The address was the latest effort by Democrats to highlight their diversity and criticize Trump's most contentious plans. Beyond his proposed wall across Mexico, the billionaire businessman has threatened to ban Muslims from entering the United States if he becomes president.


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Governor: 4 Zika cases likely came from Florida mosquitoes
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) - Florida's governor says the state likely has the first cases of Zika transmitted by mosquitoes on the U.S. mainland. Gov. Rick Scott said Friday that no mosquitoes in the state have tested positive for Zika. But he says one woman and three men in Miami-Dade and Broward counties likely contracted the virus through mosquito bites. More than 1,650 Zika infections have been reported in the U.S., but the four patients in Florida would be the first not linked to travel outside the U.S. mainland. Scott says health officials believe the infections occurred in a small area just north of downtown Miami.


Pope visits Auschwitz, begs God to forgive "so much cruelty"
OSWIECIM, Poland (AP) - Pope Francis paid a somber visit in silence to the Nazi German death camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau on Friday, with his only public comment a guest book entry begging God "forgiveness for so much cruelty." The Argentine-born pontiff made an early morning pilgrimage to the place where Adolf Hitler's forces killed more than 1 million people, most of them Jews, during World War II. Francis entered the camp on foot, walking slowly in his white robes beneath the notorious gate at Auschwitz that bears the cynical words "Arbeit Macht Frei (Work sets you free)." After meeting briefly with 11 death camp survivors, he moved on to nearby Birkenau, a sprawling complex where people were murdered in factory-like fashion in its gas chambers.


Police: 1 San Diego cop killed, another wounded in shooting
SAN DIEGO (AP) - One police officer died and another was wounded after being shot in a San Diego neighborhood, authorities said early Friday. Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman said in a Twitter post that she had left the hospital where the injured officer had come out of surgery and that he's expected to survive. The names of the officers have not been released. There was no immediate word on what touched off the violence, which occurred around 11 p.m. PDT Thursday in the southeastern part of town. Police searched the area for suspects and urged residents to stay indoors. Video footage showed officers out in force with numerous squad cars with emergency lights flashing lining a street, officers on foot, and a helicopter buzz overhead.


US GDP grows a weak 1.2 percent in second quarter
WASHINGTON (AP) - Growth in the U.S. economy was sluggish again in the spring, dashing expectations for a robust rebound after a tough winter. Stronger consumer spending was offset by weakness in housing construction and a big slowdown in the pace that businesses restocked store shelves. The Commerce Department said Friday that the gross domestic product - the broadest measure of the economy - grew at a 1.2 percent annual rate in the April-June quarter. That was far below the 2.6 percent GDP growth rate that economists had been forecasting. The government also revised down its estimate of first-quarter growth to 0.8 percent from 1.1 percent.


Rabat zoo seeks answers after elephant kills girl with stone
PARIS (AP) - Experts at a zoo in the Moroccan capital of Rabat are trying to understand why an elephant hurled a stone toward visitors, killing a 7-year-old girl. The behavior of the female elephant was "abnormal" and needs to be understood, a veterinarian at the zoo said Friday. The girl was visiting the Zoological Garden of Rabat with her family on Tuesday, admiring three elephants when one picked up a stone, then tossed it more than 10 meters (yards) over a huge ditch and a wooden barrier toward the visitors. The girl was struck in the head and died hours later.


Huge, once-hated fish now seen as weapon against Asian carp
CHICAGO (AP) - It's a toothy giant that can grow longer than a horse and heavier than a refrigerator, a fearsome-looking prehistoric fish that plied U.S. waters from the Gulf of Mexico to Illinois until it disappeared from many states a half-century ago. Persecuted by anglers and deprived of places to spawn, the alligator gar - with a head that resembles an alligator and two rows of needlelike teeth - survived primarily in southern states in the tributaries of Mississippi River and Gulf of Mexico after being declared extinct in several states farther north. To many, it was a freak, a "trash fish" that threatened sportfish, something to be exterminated.


AP PHOTOS: Shiite tattoos a show of pride amid tensions
BEIRUT (AP) - Hamada Bayloun is not particularly religious, but across his entire upper back spreads a large tattoo of the most revered saint in Shiite Islam, Imam Ali. He is one of a growing number of Shiite Muslims in Lebanon who have inked themselves with Shiite religious and political symbols as a show of pride in their community since neighboring Syria's civil war broke out in 2011, fanning hatreds between Shiites, Sunnis and other faiths across the region. The 30-year-old Bayloun got his tattoo a few months after the war began, partly as a response to attempts to bomb Shiite shrines in Syria and Iraq.

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