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Road to debate: Trump built image as he built business
WASHINGTON (AP) - Donald Trump once claimed to be publicity shy. No joke. It's right there in The New York Times of Nov. 1, 1976. In the same article, the 30-year-old real estate developer talks up his millions, showcases his penthouse apartment and Cadillac, and allows a reporter to tag along as he visits job sites and lunches at the "21" club before hopping an evening flight to California for more deal-making. So much for that shy-guy claim. Young and ambitious, Trump worked just as hard at building his image as he did at expanding his real estate empire. Along the way, he honed the communications skills that would benefit him at the negotiating table, turn him into a reality TV star and launch a presidential campaign.


Clinton as communicator, from Wellesley to campaign trail
NEW YORK (AP) - Hillary Clinton has said it herself: She's not the most naturally gifted public communicator. "I am not a natural politician, in case you haven't noticed, like my husband or President Obama," she said in March. Yet her first public speech was a star-making one, landing her in a Life magazine write-up at the tender age of 21. She was a senior at Wellesley, the first student chosen to address a commencement there. Unhappy with the words of the U.S. senator invited to speak before her, she parried with an unplanned rebuke, before launching into her prepared remarks.


In battle for Iraq's Mosul, many forces with many motives
BAGHDAD (AP) - An unlikely array of forces is converging on the city of Mosul, lining up for a battle on the historic plains of northern Iraq that is likely to be decisive in the war against the Islamic State group. The tacit alliance - Iraqi troops alongside Shiite militiamen, Sunni Arab tribesmen, Kurdish fighters and U.S special forces - underscores the importance of this battle. Retaking Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city, would effectively break the back of the militant group, ending their self-declared "caliphate," at least in Iraq. But victory doesn't mean an end to the conflict. In a post-Islamic State Iraq, the enmities and rivalries among the players in the anti-IS coalition could easily erupt.


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Mall shooting suspect: 'Creepy,' multiple arrests, disputes
OAK HARBOR, Wash. (AP) - The 20-year-old man suspected of killing five people with a rifle at a Macy's makeup counter had a string of run-ins with the law in recent years, including charges he assaulted his stepfather, and was described by a neighbor as so "creepy, rude and obnoxious" that she kept a Taser by her front door. As investigators tried to piece together information on Arcan Cetin, who was arrested Saturday evening after a nearly 24-hour manhunt, a picture emerged of a troubled young man. Court records show more than a half-dozen criminal cases in Island County alone since 2013.


At least 26 killed in Aleppo as UN meets over Syria
BEIRUT (AP) - At least 26 civilians were killed in fresh government airstrikes on the contested city of Aleppo, Syrian activists said Sunday, as the United Nations Security Council convened an emergency meeting on the spiraling violence in Syria but failed to take any action because of deep divisions between Russia and the Western powers. The United States, Britain and France, who called the emergency meeting, heaped blame on Moscow for supporting the Syrian offensive which U.N. envoy Staffan de Mistura called one of the worst of the 5 1/2-year war. When Syria's U.N. Ambassador Bashar Ja'afari was called to speak in the council, the ambassadors of the three Western powers walked out in protest.


Miami Marlins ace Jose Fernandez dies in boating accident
MIAMI (AP) - Jose Fernandez escaped from Cuba by boat on his fourth try as a teenager, and when his mother fell into the Yucatan Channel during the journey, he jumped in and pulled her out. Fernandez's heroic backstory made his death early Sunday that much more heart-wrenching. The charismatic Miami Marlins ace was killed in a boating accident at age 24. Fernandez and two other people died when their 32-foot vessel slammed into a jetty off Miami Beach, authorities said. Authorities didn't know the time of the crash. The capsized boat was found shortly after 3 a.m. "All I can do is scream in disbelief," said Hall of Famer Tony Perez, a Marlins executive and native of Cuba.


Mother uncovers lasting impact of baby son's organ donation
WASHINGTON (AP) - An ultrasound showed one of Sarah Gray's unborn twins was missing part of his brain, a fatal birth defect. His brother was born healthy but Thomas lived just six days. Latching onto hope for something positive to come from heartache, Gray donated some of Thomas' tissue for scientific research - his eyes, his liver, his umbilical cord blood. Only no one could tell the Washington mother if that precious donation really made a difference. So Gray embarked on an unusual journey to find out, revealing a side of science laymen seldom glimpse. "Infant eyes are like gold," a Harvard scientist told her.


Protests remain peaceful outside Charlotte Panthers NFL game
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) - Nightly protests have shaken the city of Charlotte since the shooting death of a black man by police last week, but Sunday's NFL game between the Carolina Panthers and the Minnesota Vikings managed to open without interruption. A group of around 100 demonstrators gathered across the street from Bank of America Stadium to keep up the pressure in the aftermath of the death of Keith Lamont Scott. The 43-year-old man was shot and killed Tuesday after a confrontation with Charlotte police. Five nights of protests followed, two of them violent. On Sunday, protesters led by a man with a bullhorn across the street from Bank of America Stadium were surrounded by at least two dozen police officers on bicycles.


LSU fires Miles, Cameron, promotes Orgeron
LSU fired coach Les Miles and offensive coordinator Cam Cameron on Sunday, and promoted defensive line coach Ed Orgeron to interim head coach. The moves came less than 24-hours after Miles briefly watched his players celebrate what they thought was a last-second winning touchdown pass at Auburn, only to walk off the field with a loss after officials determined on video replay that time had expired before the ball was snapped. It was the latest of several frantic finishes in which the clock management of a Miles-coached offense had come under intense scrutiny. It will go down as the last. "Coach Miles has done a tremendous job here and he's been a great ambassador for our University, which makes this even more difficult," LSU athletic director Joe Alleva said in a written statement.


Jewish settlement soccer clubs bring politics to the pitch
GIVAT ZEEV, West Bank (AP) - The Beitar Shabi Givat Zeev players huddled around for a training session, lobbing soccer balls as an autumn evening breeze swept through the surrounding rocky hills. It was a routine scene played out on soccer fields around the world, but if Palestinian authorities have their way, the team could soon find itself permanently sidelined. Givat Zeev and other clubs based in Israeli West Bank settlements are at the center of a showdown between Israelis and Palestinians that is set to draw soccer's global governing body FIFA into a tense dispute over Mideast politics. The Palestinians are pushing FIFA to declare the teams illegal at a meeting in Switzerland next month.