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EU lawmakers tell UK: If you're leaving, get moving
BRUSSELS (AP) - Indignant European Union lawmakers pressed Britain to end the uncertainty that has gripped European and global markets, saying Tuesday that if it intends to leave, it should start the process immediately. Prime Minister David Cameron entered talks with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker hours ahead of an EU summit which is expected to hear from the British leaders that exit talks might not be launched before October. Cameron has said he wants informal talks on what comes next before that happens. Juncker and other European leaders insisted they won't begin any talks until Britain invokes the EU Constitution's Article 50, which sets in motion a two-year process to split.


UK business in limbo in face of years of Brexit uncertainty
LONDON (AP) - The impact of Britain's vote to leave the European Union was swift and painful for Ed Bussey's small tech firm in London. The founder and CEO of Quill, an online content company, had been looking to fill a software development job paying 70,000 pounds ($95,000) a year that's been open for six months. He had a job interview set up with a promising candidate from EU member Italy on Friday - the day after the vote. "Because of what had happened on Thursday, he was not prepared to up sticks and move to London," Bussey said with chagrin.


10 Things to Know for Today
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. SUPREME COURT RULING ON ABORTION HAS WIDE-RANGING IMPACT By striking down abortion restrictions in Texas, abortion-rights activists nationwide are emboldened and a range of anti-abortion laws in numerous states are in peril. 2. MERKEL SAYS NO OBLIGATIONS, NO PRIVILEGES TO UK The German Chancellor says she will use "all her strength" to prevent the European Union from drifting apart in the wake of Britain's decision to leave the trade bloc. 3. HOW TRUMP IS SHIFTING ON MUSLIM BAN With his poll numbers sliding, his spokeswoman says he's no longer seeking the restriction at all and will instead offer an approach based on an undefined standard of terrorism.


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Supreme Court ruling imperils abortion laws in many states
NEW YORK (AP) - By striking down tough abortion restrictions in Texas, the U.S. Supreme Court has emboldened abortion-rights activists nationwide and imperiled a range of anti-abortion laws in numerous states. Many anti-abortion leaders were openly disappointed, bracing for the demise of restrictions that they had worked vigorously to enact over the past few years. The Supreme Court has decided "the abortion industry will continue to reign unchecked as mothers are subjected to subpar conditions," said Heather Weininger, executive director of Wisconsin Right to Life. On the other side of the debate, Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards hailed the ruling as "an enormous victory for women," and joined her abortion-rights allies in vowing to quickly seek gains beyond Texas.


Trump's Muslim ban: From simple clarity to plain confusion
NEW YORK (AP) - From the moment he first declared it, the plan has been a signature of his campaign for president: "Donald J. Trump is calling for a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until our country's representatives can figure out what is going on." Yet from that first moment, the Republican White House candidate has evaded questions when pressed for details. Now that he's a presumptive nominee with sliding poll numbers, his spokeswoman says he's no longer seeking the ban at all. In its place, he's offering an approach based on a standard of terrorism that he and his campaign refuse to define.


How Clinton's and Trump's economic prescriptions clash
WASHINGTON (AP) - Republican Donald Trump will deliver a speech outlining his trade policies on Tuesday - a talk that is sure to underscore the stark differences between his approach and that of likely Democratic rival Hillary Clinton when it comes to handling the economy. Trump favors big tax cuts that mainly would help the rich. Clinton wants to boost taxes on high earners. Clinton wants to raise the minimum wage nationwide. Trump favors leaving it to the states. Trump sees a middle class crushed by trade deals, globalization and shameless corporations moving jobs overseas. Clinton argues that rebuilding the middle class requires government aid for higher education and job training.


AP Source: Volkswagen reaches $14.7B emissions settlement
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Volkswagen diesel owners can choose to either sell their car back to the company or get a repair that could diminish the vehicle's performance under a settlement of claims tied to the German automaker's emissions-cheating scandal. The settlement will cost VW $14.7 billion, a person briefed on the settlement talks said Monday, but does not resolve all the legal issues stemming from its admission that nearly a half million vehicles with 2-liter diesel engines were programmed to turn on emissions controls during government lab tests and turn them off while on the road. The figure represents the largest auto scandal settlement in U.S.


Airport security fix: better training _ for humans and dogs
GLYNCO, Ga. (AP) - Covering their ears, 192 future airport security officers watched from a grandstand as Larry Colburn detonates a plastic-explosives device like the one carried by the underwear bomber in a failed attempt to blow up a plane on Christmas Day 2009. A tremendous boom was accompanied by a plume of black and gray smoke. A wave of blast pressure ripples through the air, hitting the spectators. Colburn, a former Memphis police bomb squad commander, tells his audience that a very small amount of the explosive, PTEN, can do tremendous damage. "That is an eye-opener," says Betsy Bueno. "That makes you want to do the job." Bueno is joining the Transportation Security Administration, the agency responsible for protecting the traveling public from terrorists.


US medical schools expand training to curb painkiller abuse
WORCESTER, Mass. (AP) - At first, the woman tried to hide her painkiller problem. She told the doctor that she still had pain from her past pregnancy, and that she just wanted a refill on her pain medication. After a few questions, though, she admitted that a friend had sold her some OxyContin, and that she'd stolen pills from another friend. The interaction was all staged, with the patient played by an actor and the doctor played by a medical student last month. The exercise was part of a daylong boot camp at the University of Massachusetts Medical School designed to help physicians in training identify and fight opioid abuse.


Pat Summitt, winningest coach in D1 history, has died at 64
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - Pat Summitt, the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history who uplifted the women's game from obscurity to national prominence during her 38-year career at Tennessee, died Tuesday morning. She was 64. With an icy glare on the sidelines, Summitt led the Lady Vols to eight national championships and prominence on a campus steeped in the traditions of the football-rich south until she retired in 2012. Her son, Tyler Summitt, issued a statement Tuesday morning saying his mother died peacefully at Sherrill Hill Senior Living in Knoxville surrounded by those who loved her most. "Since 2011, my mother has battled her toughest opponent, early onset dementia, 'Alzheimer's Type,' and she did so with bravely fierce determination just as she did with every opponent she ever faced," Tyler Summitt said.