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Police: Location of gunman in Colorado shooting is unknown
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) - Police were searching for a gunman Friday who opened fire near a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs. At least three officers were injured but it was not known if anyone else was wounded in the attack, authorities said. Police Lt. Catherine Buckley said authorities also did not know where the gunman was located or whether the shooter had taken any hostages. "We can't confirm where the shooter is at this point," she said. Asked if the shooter had taken hostages, Buckley told reporters: "There is that possibility. There are a lot of possibilities with this scenario." Authorities received a call of shots being fired near the Planned Parenthood clinic before noon.

How Black Friday played out around the country
NEW YORK (AP) - Black Friday, the unofficial start to the holiday shopping season, isn't always what people expect. In Colorado, for instance, marijuana stores got into the act. In Arizona, families skipped the spending frenzy to go hiking. And in Chicago, shoppers snapped photos of demonstrators protesting the police shooting of a black teenager. Overall, there seemed to be smaller crowds throughout stores and malls across the country. Here's how the day played out: --- PROTESTS ON CHICAGO'S MAGNIFICENT MILE Hundreds of protesters blocked entrances to stores in Chicago's high-end shopping district to draw attention to the police shooting of a black teenager.

France honors attack victims in city subdued by mourning
A subdued France paid homage Friday to those killed two weeks ago in the attacks that gripped Paris in fear and mourning, honoring each of the 130 dead by name as the president pledged to ?destroy the army of fanatics? who claimed so many young lives. In Belgium, authorities charged a man with ?terrorist attacks? as investigators worked to hone in on culprits. The federal prosecutor?s office said the man arrested a day earlier in Brussels, not identified, was "charged with terrorist attacks and taking part in the activities of a terrorist group." France?s somber homage to the victims bespoke the horrors of Nov.

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Gunmen mercilessly mowed down guests in Mali hotel siege
BAMAKO, Mali (AP) - The early breakfast crowd sipped coffee and picked at croissants in the Radisson Blu's dining room, swiping through emails and the morning headlines on their smartphones. Outside the luxury hotel, the dusty, red-earth streets were coming alive with traffic, the whine of motorbikes mixed with the rumble of minibus taxis amid the bustle of one of Africa's fastest-growing cities. Five hotel security guards were just finishing the overnight shift and about to make the handoff to their dayside colleagues. Another night, another "Rien a signaler" (French for "Nothing to report"). As one of the guards would later say, "We weren't concentrating." That was the precise moment the attackers were waiting for on the morning of Nov.

Strikes on IS city, focus of international campaign, kill 8
BEIRUT (AP) - A new wave of airstrikes targeting the Syrian city of Raqqa, the headquarters of the extremist Islamic State group and the focus of an international military campaign, killed at least eight people, including five children, Syrian opposition groups said Friday. The strikes came as France's foreign minister, Laurent Fabius, declared that destroying the IS headquarters and "neutralizing and eradicating" the extremist group is the main objective of the international campaign. It wasn't immediately clear who carried out the latest airstrikes. The city in northern Syria is the group's de facto capital and has become the focus of international airstrikes in the wake of the Paris terror attacks and the bombing of a Russian jetliner over Egypt's Sinai Peninsula.

As many African-American see it, there are 2 Ben Carsons
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) - Ayauna King-Baker loved Ben Carson's "Gifted Hands" memoir so much that she made her daughter Shaliya read it. So when Carson showed up in town to sign copies of his new book, King-Baker dragged the giggly 13-year-old along to the bookstore so they could both meet him. To King-Baker, Carson's "up-by-your bootstraps" life story makes him a genuine celebrity worth emulating in the African-American community. But she's also a Pompano Beach Democrat watching Carson rise in the Republican presidential polls. For King-Baker and many other African-Americans, the vast majority of whom are Democrats, there are two Carsons: One is a genius doctor and inspirational speaker and writer who talks of limitless horizons; the other is a White House candidate who pushes conservative politics and wishes to "de-emphasize race." How they reconcile the two may help determine whether Republicans can dent the solid support Democrats have enjoyed in the black community for decades.

Reporter mocked by Trump says the 2 knew each other well
WASHINGTON (AP) - Donald Trump said he couldn't have been making fun of a reporter's disability because he doesn't know the man. Not so, says the reporter. Serge Kovaleski of The New York Times says he has met Trump repeatedly, interviewing him in his office and talking to him at news conferences, when he worked for the New York Daily News in the late 1980s. "Donald and I were on a first-name basis for years," he said in a Times story about the Republican presidential candidate's behavior at a rally in South Carolina last week. Onstage Tuesday, a mocking Trump flailed his arms in an apparent attempt to imitate mannerisms of the "poor guy." He accused Kovaleski of backing off a story from a week after the 9/11 attacks that said authorities in New Jersey detained and questioned "a number of people who were allegedly seen celebrating the attacks." Kovaleski then worked for The Washington Post.

Super Bowl of shopping is more like a scrimmage
NEW YORK (AP) - The annual ritual of Black Friday, as we know it, is over. Gone are the throngs of frenzied shoppers camping out for days ahead of the big sales bonanza on the day after Thanksgiving. And forget the fisticuffs over flat-screen TVs. Instead, stores around the country had sparse parking lots, calm, orderly lines, and modest traffic. Black Friday, which traditionally is the biggest shopping day of the year, almost looked like a normal shopping day. And not every shopper was happy about that. In Denver, for instance, Susan Montoya had nearly an entire Kmart to herself Friday morning.

A search for family in Haiti raises questions about adoption
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) - As Mariette Williams waited for her flight from South Florida to Haiti, she paced the departure lounge, folding and re-folding her ticket and clutching the handle of a bag sagging with gifts. She was excited but terrified: For the first time in nearly 30 years, she was about to see her mother. Colas Bazile Etienne was a shadow at the very edge of her daughter's memories, staying out of focus no matter how hard Mariette tried. She knew her mother was a desperately poor Haitian woman who had given her up for adoption, but why? Because she had too many children? Because she wanted to give Mariette a better life? Because she had hoped for exactly this, that her daughter would one day come back to help the family?

Protest over Chicago teen's shooting ties up retail district
CHICAGO (AP) - Hundreds of protesters blocked store entrances and shut down four lanes of traffic in Chicago's ritziest shopping district on Black Friday to draw attention to the 2014 police killing of a black teenager who was shot 16 times by a white officer. Demonstrators shrugged off a cold drizzling rain to turn the traditional start of the holiday shopping season on Michigan Avenue's Magnificent Mile into a high-profile platform from which to deliver their message: The killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald was another example of what they say is the systemic disregard police show for the lives and rights of black people.