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Hollande and Putin agree on closer anti-IS coordination
French President Francois Hollande and Russia?s Vladimir Putin agreed to share intelligence information and cooperate on selecting targets in the fight against the Islamic State group, raising hope for closer ties between Moscow and the U.S.-led anti-IS coalition following the Paris terror attacks. Putin said that Russia is ready to more broadly coordinate its military action in Syria with the U.S.-led coalition, but he harshly criticized Washington for failing to prevent the downing of a Russian warplane by NATO member Turkey. Hollande said Tuesday?s shoot-down of the Russian jet was a ?serious incident, obviously regrettable? that underlined the need for closer coordination between the nations which are fighting the IS.

The Latest: Putin: Russia to cooperate with US-led coalition
BEIRUT (AP) - The latest developments regarding the war in Syria. All times local. 10:20 p.m. French President Francois Hollande says the downing of a Russian warplane by Turkey was a "serious incident, obviously regrettable." Hollande, who was speaking Thursday after talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin, added that it's necessary to draw conclusions from that and to "strengthen the coordination between the countries." Turkey shot down the Russian Su-24 military jet on Tuesday near the Syrian border, insisting it had violated its airspace despite repeated warnings - a claim Russia denies. Russia and France also agreed to coordinate their strikes against the Islamic State group.

The Latest: Belgium says likely Paris fugitive gets help
PARIS (AP) - The latest on the attacks in Paris and security alert in Brussels. All times local: 7:40 p.m. Belgian Justice Minister Koen Geens said that Paris fugitive Salah Abdeslam is "likely" getting support from others during his continued flight from authorities. After a manhunt stretching for nearly two weeks, Geens said it was unlikely Abdeslam could hide for so long on his own. "If someone is on the run on his own, he is caught quickly, while it is tougher to find someone who is not alone. The latter is likely," he told VTM network after Thursday's meeting of the national security council.

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Trump called out for appearing to mock disability
WASHINGTON (AP) - Donald Trump denied Thursday that he mocked a reporter with a disability in a South Carolina speech, despite appearing to imitate mannerisms of the "poor guy" and make fun of him. A statement posted on his Twitter account said Trump doesn't know the reporter personally or what he looks like and was only mocking his journalism. The New York Times reporter, Serge Kovaleski, "should stop using his disability to grandstand," the statement quoted Trump as saying. Kovaleski has a congenital condition that affects joint movement. In a speech Tuesday in South Carolina, Trump said, "Poor guy, you oughta see this guy," and gestured in a jerky fashion as if imitating Kovaleski's movements.

Teen killed by Chicago officer had broken, troubled family
CHICAGO (AP) - A black teenager shot 16 times by a white Chicago police officer was a ward of the state when he died, having spent years being shuttled between different relatives' homes and foster care from the time he was 3. Laquan McDonald, whose name demonstrators have shouted for two days and will shout again during a planned rally to disrupt the city's famed Magnificent Mile shopping corridor Friday, lived a troubled, disadvantaged life and had at least one previous brush with the law. School officials and the McDonald family lawyer say there were signs Laquan was trying to get his life in order, though prosecutors say he had drugs in his system and was burglarizing cars on Oct.

The Latest: Friday's protest to target main shopping area
CHICAGO (AP) - The latest on the aftermath of the shooting of a black teenager by a white Chicago police officer (all times local): 2:05 p.m. A march protesting the videotaped slaying of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald by a Chicago police officer is planned Friday in the city's busiest shopping district on the busiest shopping day of the year. The Rev. Jesse Jackson says the march will begin at 11 a.m. Friday. He and others are trying to bring attention to the 2014 incident, in which the black teenager was shot 16 times by a white police officer. Organizers say it was a flawed investigation and authorities tried to keep the videotape from being released.

Big balloons, heavy security for NYC Thanksgiving parade
NEW YORK (AP) - Americans paused Thursday to celebrate their blessings despite terrorism fears and racial tensions over fatal police shootings across the country. A record number of police officers patrolled the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York, while St. Louis resumed its annual parade, canceled last year amid protests over Michael Brown's death. At the White House, President Barack Obama spent a quiet holiday with a traditional meal. Here's a look at how other Americans celebrated: --- TIGHT SECURITY FOR SNOOPY AND SPONGEBOB Spectators at the annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York noted a stepped-up police presence, with officers perched on buildings like Radio City Music Hall and watching from helicopters hovering overhead.

Pope says 'catastrophic' if interests derail climate talks
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) - Pope Francis warned Thursday that it would be "catastrophic" for world leaders to let special interest groups get in the way of a global agreement to curb fossil fuel emissions as he brought his environmental message to the heart of Africa on the eve of crucial climate change talks in Paris. Francis issued the pointed warning in a speech to the U.N.'s regional office here after celebrating his first public Mass on the continent. The joyous, rain-soaked ceremony before 300,000 faithful saw the Argentine pope being serenaded by ululating Swahili singers, swaying nuns, Maasai tribesmen and dancing children dressed in the colors of Kenya's flag.

Russia strikes back at Turkey with economic sanctions
MOSCOW (AP) - Russia plans to retaliate against Turkey for the downing of a warplane by imposing sanctions, cutting economic ties and scrapping major investment projects. Since the plane was shot down Tuesday on the Syria-Turkey border, Russia has already restricted tourism, left Turkish trucks stranded at the border and confiscated large quantities of Turkish food imports. On Thursday, Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev ordered his government to also draft sanctions against Turkey within two days in response to what he described as an "act of aggression against our country." The sanctions will include "restrictions and bans on Turkish economic structures operating in Russian territory, restrictions and bans on deliveries of products, including foodstuffs," as well as on labor and services.

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