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AP Top News at 6:51 p.m. EST

Outrage: Extremists take ancient statues, damage Iraqi site
BAGHDAD (AP) - Islamic State extremists trucked away statues as they damaged the irreplaceable remains of an ancient Assyrian capital, a local resident and a top UN official told The Associated Press Friday. Nimrud, a nearly 3,000-year-old city in present-day Iraq, included monumental statues of winged bulls, bearded horsemen and other winged figures, all symbols of an ancient Mesopotamian empire in the cradle of Western civilization.


Obama: Ferguson report exposed racially biased system
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - Racial discrimination from police in Ferguson, Missouri, was "oppressive and abusive," President Barack Obama said Friday as he called for criminal justice reform as part of the modern struggle for civil rights. "It turns out they weren't just making it up. This was happening," Obama said during a town hall at South Carolina's Benedict College, the day before he prepared to commemorate a half-century since the historic civil rights marches in Selma, Alabama.


US: NKorea response to attack on ambassador 'callous'
WASHINGTON (AP) - The United States on Friday condemned North Korea's "callous" reaction to the knife attack on the U.S. ambassador to South Korea that has added to tensions on the divided Korean Peninsula. An anti-U.S. activist is accused of attacking Ambassador Mark Lippert with a 10-inch (25-centimeter) knife in Seoul Thursday, causing deep gashes on his face and hand.


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AP Source: Federal charges expected against Sen. Menendez
WASHINGTON (AP) - Sen. Bob Menendez, under federal investigation for his relationship with a Florida doctor and political donor, is expected to face criminal charges in the coming weeks, a person familiar with the matter said Friday. The disclosure came as Menendez, a New Jersey Democrat, said he will answer questions from reporters in his home state after his office issued a statement saying all of his actions have been appropriate and lawful.


Ferguson police chief stays on the job after federal report
ST. LOUIS (AP) - Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson was still on the job Friday, two days after a government report blasted his beleaguered department for years of racial profiling, and the mayor refused to speculate about the chief's future, saying his role was not to "just chop heads." Meanwhile, three Ferguson employees implicated in racist emails exposed by that report are now gone from their jobs, the mayor said. One was identified as a city court clerk.


'Homebrew' email servers: Genius as well as sneaky?
WASHINGTON (AP) - No, it's not always a room filled with wires and glowing blue lights. It's probably not even the size of your furnace. The personal email server used by Hillary Rodham Clinton during her time as secretary of state was most likely about the size of your office desktop computer and could have been tucked quietly in a corner somewhere. She's come a long way since 1997, when Clinton's staff bought the then-first lady a copy of the book "E-Mail for Dummies."


FOIA rules to guide review of Clinton emails for publication
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Obama administration said Friday it will apply the legal provisions of the Freedom of Information Act to determine what parts of Hillary Rodham Clinton's official emails when she was secretary of state will be released publicly from her private account. The law contains nine exemptions to censor or withhold parts of records. The decision means that any finding by State Department reviewers that her private emails included classified or otherwise sensitive data would be indicated, even if the information is marked out. Under that law, reviewers need to specify which of the nine exceptions they're citing to censor a passage.


Why 5.5 percent unemployment isn't as great as it seems
WASHINGTON (AP) - Unemployment in the U.S. has dropped to a seven-year low of 5.5 percent - a level normally considered the mark of a healthy job market. Yet that number isn't as encouraging as it might sound. While U.S. employers added a solid 295,000 jobs in February, and the jobless rate fell from 5.7 percent, it went down mostly because many people gave up looking for work and were no longer officially counted as unemployed, the government reported Friday. What's more, wage gains remained sluggish.


Doctor helping downed pilot is shocked to find Harrison Ford
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Dr. Sanjay Khurana was close to finishing a golf game when a vintage plane clipped a tree and "dropped like a rock" onto the next hole's green. He rushed to the crash, finding a pilot bleeding from a deep gash in his head. When the surgeon got a closer look, he was stunned to see the pilot was Harrison Ford, the actor he grew up watching in the "Star Wars" and "Indiana Jones" movie franchises.


5 things about the 50th anniversary of the Selma marches
WASHINGTON (AP) - This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday," a civil rights march in which protesters were beaten, trampled and tear-gassed by police at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. On March 7, 1965, marchers were walking from Selma to the state capital, Montgomery, to demand an end to discriminatory practices that robbed blacks of their right to vote. It took two more attempts for marchers to successfully complete their journey. Images of the violence during the first march shocked the nation and turned up the pressure to pass the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which helped open voter rolls to millions of Southern blacks. Five things to know about Bloody Sunday:

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