desertdispatch.com
 

AP Top News at 5:08 a.m. EDT

Russian aid convoy drives into Ukraine
IZVARYNE, Ukraine (AP) - An Associated Press reporter has seen the first trucks in a Russian aid convoy crossing into eastern Ukraine after more than a week's delay amid suspicions the mission was being used as a cover for an invasion by Moscow. Trucks loaded with water, generators and sleeping bags are intended for civilians in the city of Luhansk, where pro-Russian separatist fighters are besieged by government forces. Shelling of the city has been ongoing for weeks.


Hamas kills 11 suspected informers for Israel
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) - A Gaza security official says Hamas has killed 11 suspected informers for Israel. Friday's killings came a day after Israel killed three top Hamas military commanders in an airstrike on a house in southern Gaza Strip.


Obama faces options in Iraq and Syria
WASHINGTON (AP) - At the heart of President Barack Obama's quandary over the Islamic State militants is their haven in Syria. The president may continue helping Iraqi forces try to reverse the group's land grabs in northern Iraq by providing more arms and American military advisers and by using U.S. warplanes to support Iraqi ground operations.


Watch Top News Video




MH17 remains return home as govt battles fallout
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) - Carried by soldiers and draped in the national flag, coffins carrying Malaysian victims of Flight MH17 returned home Friday to a country still searching for those onboard another doomed jet and a government battling the political fallout of the twin tragedies. The bodies and ashes of 20 victims from the Malaysia Airlines jet that was shot down over eastern Ukraine in July were given full military honors and a day of national mourning was declared, the first in the country's history.


American Ebola doc urges help fighting outbreak
ATLANTA (AP) - As one of few Ebola survivors with medical expertise, Dr. Kent Brantly seems keenly aware of the position his painful experience has put him in. He hasn't spoken yet about his plans, but spent much of his first public appearance pleading for help for countries still struggling with the virus. "I am forever thankful to God for sparing my life and am glad for any attention my sickness has attracted to the plight of West Africa in the midst of this epidemic," Brantly said Thursday at a news conference before leaving Emory University Hospital, where he and a medical missionary colleague spent three weeks in an isolation unit as they recovered.


Ferguson fallout: A call for police 'body cams'
NEW YORK (AP) - What if Michael Brown's last moments had been recorded? The fatal police shooting of the unarmed black 18-year-old in Ferguson, Missouri, is prompting calls for more officers to wear so-called body cameras, simple, lapel-mounted gadgets that capture video footage of law enforcement's interactions with the public. Proponents say the devices add a new level of accountability to police work.


National Guard to withdraw from a quieter Ferguson
FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) - The streets of Ferguson were peaceful for another night, as protests and tensions were subsiding in the St. Louis suburb where unrest had erupted after a white police officer fatally shot an unarmed black 18-year-old. Gov. Jay Nixon also ordered the Missouri National Guard, which arrived Monday, to begin withdrawing as flare-ups have been easing. Police have made only a handful of arrests in the protest area on the past two nights.


Coal gas boom in China holds climate change risks
HEXIGTEN, China (AP) - Deep in the hilly grasslands of remote Inner Mongolia, twin smoke stacks rise more than 200 feet into the sky, their steam and sulfur billowing over herds of sheep and cattle. Both day and night, the rumble of this power plant echoes across the ancient steppe, and its acrid stench travels dozens of miles away. This is the first of more than 60 coal-to-gas plants China wants to build, mostly in remote parts of the country where ethnic minorities have farmed and herded for centuries. Fired up in December, the multibillion-dollar plant bombards millions of tons of coal with water and heat to produce methane, which is piped to Beijing to generate electricity.


Jell-O can't stop slippery sales slide
NEW YORK (AP) - Jell-O has lost its jiggle and nobody knows how to fix it. The dessert was invented more than a century ago and helped popularize a delicacy reserved for the rich into a quick, affordable treat. Americans of all ages are familiar with the famous "J-E-L-L-O" jingle and TV ads featuring comedian Bill Cosby. Knocking back Jell-O shots made with alcohol is a college memory for many.


More schools are mixing beer, football at stadiums
Walk through the tailgate area at a college football stadium, and beer drinking is as common a sight as fans adorned in jerseys of their favorite players. A growing number of schools are bringing the party inside, opening taps in concourses that traditionally have been alcohol-free zones.