AP Top News at 4:57 p.m. EST

Zuckerberg?s a dad, and he?s giving away his money
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife are celebrating the birth of a daughter by announcing plans to donate most of their wealth - or about $45 billion - to a new organization they?re creating to tackle a broad range of the world?s ills. Zuckerberg?s wife, Priscilla Chan, gave birth last week to a daughter whom they?ve named Max. Announcing the birth on Facebook, Zuckerberg said he and Chan will commit 99 percent of their Facebook stock to such causes as fighting disease, improving education, harnessing clean energy, reducing poverty and promoting equal rights. They are forming a new organization, called the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, to pursue those goals.

Obama says parts of climate deal must be legally binding
PARIS (AP) - President Barack Obama said Tuesday that parts of the global warming deal being negotiated in Paris should be legally binding on the participating countries, setting up a potential fight with Republicans at home. Obama's stand won praise at the U.N. climate conference from those who want a strong agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the burning of coal, oil and gas. But it could rile conservatives in Washington, especially if he tries to put the deal into effect without seeking congressional approval. The Obama administration has pledged during the international talks to reduce U.S. emissions by up to 28 percent by 2025.

US sending new special ops force to fight Islamic State
WASHINGTON (AP) - The U.S. military will deploy a new special operations force to Iraq to step up the fight against Islamic State militants unleashing violence in Iraq and Syria and determined to hold territory they have seized across the Middle East, Defense Secretary Ash Carter told Congress on Tuesday. Carter, who testified alongside Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, faced skeptical lawmakers who argued that the U.S. needs to be more forceful in countering the threat from IS, credited with attacks in Paris and Beirut and the downing of a Russian airliner. Carter told the House Armed Services Committee that over time, the special operations force will be able to conduct raids, free hostages, gather intelligence and capture IS leaders.

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Iraqi forces surround Ramadi, but it could be a long siege
BAGHDAD (AP) - After months of sluggish progress, stalled advances and outright failures, Iraqi troops and militias backed by U.S.-led airstrikes have surrounded the key city of Ramadi and appear poised to launch a new attempt to wrest it from the Islamic State group. The battle that is shaping up threatens to turn into a drawn-out siege, with thousands of residents caught in the middle as the forces try to wear down the militants since they took over the capital of western Anbar province in May. Western officials and analysts warned that the strategy of a methodical, slow siege could make the fight even more difficult.

For gays under IS rule, isolation and fear of a cruel death
REYHANLI, Turkey (AP) - Before a crowd of men on a street in the Syrian city of Palmyra, the masked Islamic State group judge read out the sentence against the two men convicted of homosexuality: They would be thrown to their deaths from the roof of the nearby Wael Hotel. He asked one of the men if he was satisfied with the sentence. Death, the judge told him, would help cleanse him of his sin. "I'd prefer if it if you shoot me in the head," 32-year-old Hawas Mallah replied helplessly. The second man, 21-year-old Mohammed Salameh, pleaded for a chance to repent, promising never to have sex with a man again, according to a witness among the onlookers that sunny July morning who gave The Associated Press a rare first-hand account.

Chicago mayor fires police chief in wake of video release
CHICAGO (AP) - Rahm Emanuel sought for months to keep the public from seeing a video that shows a white police officer shooting a black teenager 16 times. Now, a week after the video's release, the Chicago mayor has fired the police superintendent, created a new task force for police accountability and expanded the use of body cameras. But Emanuel's effort to keep the video secret and his long wait to take action at the police department has stirred deep skepticism among those protesting the teen's death. Many activists are especially incensed by the fact that the video first surfaced during a re-election campaign, when the mayor was seeking African-American votes.

Appalachia grasps for hope as coal jobs fade
WELCH, W.Va. (AP) - The seams of coal in some of Eddie Asbury's mines in McDowell County are so thin workers can barely squeeze down them. They enter on carts nearly flat on their backs, the roof of the mine coursing by just a few inches in front of their faces. They don't stand up all day. To keep his business operating with such a paltry amount of coal, Asbury has to do everything himself. He has no use for the shiny, multimillion-dollar mining machines on display this fall at the biannual coal show nearby. His equipment is secondhand stuff that he repairs and refurbishes. The coal he and his workers scrape out of the mountain is washed and prepared for sale in a plant Asbury and a colleague built themselves.

Voters wonder if Cruz can heal Washington's bitter divisions
CLINTON, Iowa (AP) - Iowa Republican Sharon Gilbert thinks her party veered off course in the past two presidential elections by nominating candidates who were too moderate. This time around, the 73-year-old Gilbert wants to send a staunch conservative into the general election, and she thinks Texas Sen. Ted Cruz might be that candidate. But she also has a nagging feeling that Cruz's hard-line views and combative style might keep him from getting anything done in Washington, a city where he's frustrated his own party's congressional leaders as much as - if not more than - the Democrats. "I know he's very far to the right, but I hope that he could work with both sides," says Gilbert, who attended a town hall event with Cruz in her hometown of Clinton.

Southern California man dies in crash hours after good deed
SAN DIEGO (AP) - A San Diego-area woman is working to honor the memory of a stranger who died hours after he paid for her groceries and asked her to "pay it forward." Matthew Jackson, of Oceanside, was killed in a crash on Nov. 11, less than 24 hours after he met Jamie-Lynne Knighten, KNSD-TV in San Diego reported ( ). Knighten was ahead of Jackson in line to pay for her groceries with her crying infant when her card was declined. That's when Jackson stepped up and offered to foot the bill, which came to more than $200. The 28-year-old wanted one thing in return.

Dancing cop disinvited from 2nd city, blasts NAACP head
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) - A second city on Tuesday withdrew its invitation for Rhode Island's "Dancing Cop" to direct holiday traffic because of his activism against the Black Lives Matter movement. The retired officer responded by blasting the head of the Providence NAACP and threatening to sue his detractors for defamation. East Providence Mayor Thomas Rose called Tony Lepore on Tuesday morning to tell him city leaders did not support his planned performance, Lepore said. A City Council vote that had been scheduled for Tuesday evening was canceled. Lepore, who retired from the Providence Police Department in 1989, has been directing traffic with dance moves since 1984.