AP Top News at 12:15 a.m. EDT

Boston police safely blow up suspicious backpacks
BOSTON (AP) - Survivors, first responders and relatives of those killed in the Boston Marathon bombing marked the anniversary Tuesday with tributes that combined sorrow over the loss of innocent victims with pride over the city's resilience in the face of a terror attack. "This day will always be hard, but this place will always be strong," former Mayor Thomas Menino told an invitation-only audience of about 2,500 people at the Hynes Convention Center, not far from the finish line, where two pressure cooker bombs hidden in backpacks killed three people and injured more than 260 others a year ago.


Ukraine bares teeth against eastern uprising
KRAMATORSK, Ukraine (AP) - In the first Ukrainian military action against a pro-Russian uprising in the east, government forces repelled an attack Tuesday by about 30 gunmen at an airport, beginning what the president called an "anti-terrorist operation" to try to restore authority over the restive region. The central government has so far been unable to rein in the insurgents, who it says are being stirred up by paid operatives from Russia and have seized numerous government facilities in at least nine eastern cities to press their demands for broader autonomy and closer ties with Russia. Complicating the political landscape, many local security forces have switched to their side.


10 Things to Know for Wednesday
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Wednesday: 1. UKRAINE TROOPS TURN BACK INSURGENTS


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New York police disband unit that spied on Muslims
NEW YORK (AP) - A special New York Police Department unit that sparked controversy by tracking the daily lives of Muslims in an effort to detect terror threats has been disbanded, police officials said Tuesday. NYPD spokesman Stephen Davis confirmed that detectives assigned to the unit had been transferred to other duties within the department's Intelligence Division.


Iran cuts proliferation-prone uranium stock
VIENNA (AP) - Diplomats say the U.N. will certify later this week that Iran's ability to make a nuclear bomb has been reduced because it has neutralized half of its material that can be turned quickly into weapons-grade uranium. The move is part of Iran's commitments under a deal that mandates nuclear concessions by Tehran in exchange for a partial lifting of sanctions crippling its economy.


Supremacist faces murder charges in Kansas deaths
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) - A white supremacist charged in shootings that left three people dead at two Jewish community sites in suburban Kansas City was brought into a video conference room in a wheelchair Tuesday to make his first court appearance. Wearing a dark, sleeveless anti-suicide smock, Frazier Glenn Cross stood under his own power to face the camera, crossing his arms and speaking only when answering routine questions from the judge in a Johnson County courtroom several miles away. He requested a court-appointed lawyer.


Violence surges from Islamic uprising in Nigeria
LAGOS, Nigeria (AP) - Suspected Muslim extremists kidnapped about 100 girls Tuesday from a school in northeastern Nigeria, less than a day after militants bombed a bus station and killed 75 people in the capital - a surge of violence that raised new doubts about the military's ability to contain an Islamic uprising. With an 11-month-old state of emergency in three northeastern states failing to bring relief, the attacks are increasing calls for President Goodluck Jonathan to rethink his strategy in confronting the biggest threat to the security of Africa's most populous nation.


Police: GPS helped solve, didn't deter killings
SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) - GPS technology helped police link two convicted sex offenders to the rapes and killings of at least four women in California, but the mother of one victim said Tuesday that the monitoring system should have done more to prevent the crimes in the first place. "If they were monitored correctly, then maybe none of this would have happened," said Jodi Michelle Pier-Estepp, the mother of victim Jarrae Nykkole Estepp, whose naked body was found March 14 on a conveyor belt at an Anaheim trash-sorting plant.


1 dead, after ferry sinks off South Korean coast
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - Dozens of military boats and helicopters scrambled Wednesday to rescue more than 470 people, including 325 high school students on a school trip, after a ferry sank off South Korea's southern coast, officials said. At least one person died and 14 were said to have been injured. The ferry with 476 people was sailing to the southern island of Jeju when it sent a distress call Wednesday morning after it began leaning to one side, according to Ministry of Security and Public Administration. The government said about 95 percent of the ship was submerged.


Many questions about mom accused in infant deaths
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - Investigators are reconstructing a mysterious decade from Megan Huntsman's life as they try to figure out how she concealed seven pregnancies before allegedly strangling or suffocating her newborns. Utah investigators are examining DNA from the babies to determine who the parents are, studying the bones to find out how long ago the babies died and interrogating family members and talking to neighbors in pursuit of clues about how she did it. They are trying to determine why she did it and who else, if anybody, knew about it or was involved. During the timeline she's given, she lived in the house with her now estranged husband and their three daughters.

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