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The Latest: Under fire, Dem chair Wasserman Schultz to leave
Debbie Wasserman Schultz says she is stepping down as Democratic Party chairwoman at the end of this week's convention. The Florida congresswoman has been under fire following the publication of hacked emails suggesting the Democratic National Committee favored Hillary Clinton in the presidential primaries. That prompted runner-up Bernie Sanders to call Sunday for Wasserman Schultz's immediate resignation. In a statement, Wasserman Schultz says she still plans to fulfill her duties formally opening and closing the convention in Philadelphia. She also says she will speak at the four-day gathering.


On eve of convention, Democratic chair announces resignation
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Debbie Wasserman Schultz is resigning under pressure as Democratic Party chairwoman, a stunning leadership shakeup as party officials gather in Philadelphia to nominate Hillary Clinton. Wasserman Schultz's announcement Sunday follows a firestorm over hacked emails suggesting the Democratic National Committee favored Clinton during the primary, despite pledging neutrality. The leaked emails prompted primary runner-up Bernie Sanders to call for Wasserman Schultz's immediate resignation. In a statement, Wasserman Schultz said she will step down at the end of the four-day convention. She said she plans to formally open and close the convention, as well as address delegates. Her statement does not address the email controversy.


IOC leaders stop short of complete ban on Russians from Rio
LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) - Olympic leaders stopped short Sunday of imposing a complete ban on Russia from the Rio de Janeiro Games, leaving individual global sports federations to decide which athletes should be cleared to compete. The decision, announced after a three-hour meeting of the International Olympic Committee's executive board, came just 12 days before the Aug. 5 opening of the games. "We had to balance the collective responsibility and the individual justice to which every human being and athlete is entitled to," IOC President Thomas Bach said. The IOC rejected calls from the World Anti-Doping Agency and many other anti-doping bodies to exclude the entire Russian Olympic team following allegations of state-sponsored cheating.


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The Latest: Marathon record holder criticizes IOC decision
World marathon record holder Paula Radcliffe has accused Olympic leaders of weakness in the fight against doping and not doing enough to protect clean athletes. Radcliffe says it is "unfair" of the International Olympic Committee to leave it to individual sports to decide whether or not Russians should be allowed to compete in Rio de Janeiro. "A truly strong message for clean sport would have been to ban all those who have been caught cheating," Radcliffe said in a statement posted on Twitter. "In short, it does not send the clear message it could have done that doping and cheating in all Olympic sport will never be tolerated." The Briton called the Olympic body's ruling a "sad day for clean sport.


Afghanistan marks day of national mourning after huge attack
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) - Afghanistan marked a national day of mourning on Sunday, a day after a suicide bomber killed at least 80 people who were taking part in a peaceful demonstration in Kabul. The attack was claimed by the Islamic State group. Authorities say another 231 people were wounded, some seriously, in the bombing Saturday afternoon on a march by members of the ethnic Hazara community, who are predominantly Shiite Muslim. Most Afghans are Sunni, and the IS group regards Shiites as apostates. The attack was the first by IS on Kabul - and the capital's worst since a vicious Taliban insurgency began 15 years ago - raising concerns about the group's reach and capability in Afghanistan.


After Obama's green light, Afghan forces on the offensive
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) - After two years of heavy casualties, the Afghan military is trying to retake the initiative in the war against militants with a new offensive against Islamic State group loyalists, an assault that will see American troops back on the battlefield working more closely with Afghan soldiers. Afghan President Ashraf Ghani recently announced a major assault against fighters loyal to the Islamic State group, who over the past year captured positions along Afghanistan's eastern border with Pakistan, mainly in Nangarhar province. That goal to uproot IS from Afghanistan has taken on new urgency in the wake of a deadly suicide bombing of a protest march Saturday in Kabul that killed at least 80 people.


Crash kills Nebraska punter, Michigan State former punter
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) - A sheriff's department official says Nebraska punter Sam Foltz and former Michigan State punter Mike Sadler have died in a car crash in Wisconsin after coaching at a kicking clinic. Louisiana State's kicker was injured in the crash. Waukesha County Lt. Thom Moerman said speed was likely a factor in the single-vehicle crash that happened around 11:45 p.m. Saturday night. The 24-year-old Sadler, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, was driving. He and 22-year-old Foltz, of Greeley, Nebraska, both died. LSU kicker, 21-year-old Colby Delahoussaye, was also a passenger and was injured in the crash. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln said Sunday the team will skip this week's planned Big Ten media days in Chicago because of Foltz's death.


Munich shooter was bullied loner, planned attack for a year
MUNICH (AP) - The teenager behind the deadly shooting rampage in Munich was a withdrawn loner obsessed with playing "killer" video games in his bedroom, a victim of bullying who suffered from panic attacks set off by contacts with other people, investigators said Sunday, adding that he had planned the attack for a year. Law enforcement officials piecing together a portrait of the 18-year-old shooter said he was seeing a doctor up to last month for treatment of depression and psychiatric problems that began in 2015 with inpatient hospital care and then was followed up with outpatient visits. They said medication for his problems had been found his room.


2 years after Ferguson, recriminations roil governor's race
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - It has been two years since a white police officer fatally shot black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, touching off days of rioting, but the political repercussions from the incident have only intensified, fanned by a governor's race in which all four Republican candidates are pledging an aggressive law-and-order approach. Their TV ads show images of angry protesters and burning buildings and vehicles. They denounce "lawlessness" and "chaos" while promising to "secure our streets" and "enforce the law." Absent from the ads is any reference to community complaints after the Brown shooting that police discriminate against black residents.


Thousands hit Philadelphia's steamy streets to protest DNC
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Thousands of demonstrators are taking to Philadelphia's sweltering streets Sunday, chanting and beating drums in the first major protests ahead of the Democratic National Convention, as the city wilts during a heat wave. Throngs of clean energy activists jammed a major thoroughfare in their mile-long march from Philadelphia's City Hall to Independence Mall, near the Liberty Bell. They held anti-fracking and anti-pipeline signs, some with illustrations like a train surrounded by a fireball and the words "No Exploding Trains." Others held "Bernie or Bust" signs. Sam Miller, 82, traveled from Erie, Pennsylvania, to join the march that stretched several blocks and across a wide street as temperatures in the city soared into the mid-90s.



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