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AP Top News at 11:31 p.m. EDT

Kentucky clerks to license marriages as their boss is jailed
ASHLAND, Ky. (AP) - A defiant county clerk went to jail Thursday for refusing to issue marriage licenses to gay couples, but five of her deputies agreed to issue the licenses themselves, potentially ending the church-state standoff in Rowan County, Kentucky. U.S. District Judge David Bunning said he had no choice but to jail Kim Davis for contempt after she insisted that her "conscience will not allow" her to follow federal court rulings on gay marriage.


Hungary opens door to trains for migrants, but only to camps
BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) - Thousands of people desperate to reach Western Europe rushed into a Budapest train station Thursday after police ended a two-day blockade, setting off a wave of anger and confusion as hundreds shoved their way onto a waiting train. But when it tried to drop them off at a Hungarian camp for asylum seekers, a bitter showdown began. One man threw his wife and infant son onto the tracks, screaming in Arabic, "We won't move from here!" Police surrounded the prone family, pulled the husband away and handcuffed him as he wailed. His wife and diaper-clad boy - apparently uninjured despite their stumbling descent onto the tracks - were freed and allowed to rejoin other migrants.


10 Things to Know for Friday
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Friday: 1. JUDGE SENDS KENTUCKY COURT CLERK TO JAIL


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Image of dead child on beach haunts and frustrates the world
The photo of the dead 3-year-old Syrian boy on a Turkish beach is haunting. It captures everything we don't want to see when we tap our phones or open our newspapers: a vicious civil war, a surge of refugees, the death of an innocent.


AP PHOTOS: Searing images of past crises
The photo of a dead 3-year-old Syrian boy on a Turkish beach captures everything we don't want to see when we tap our phones or open our newspapers: a vicious civil war, a surge of refugees, the death of an innocent. The disturbing image taken this week brings to mind other, similarly haunting photos of crises. Often they involve children. Will the photo of the Syrian child be like other seared-in-our-memory photographs? Over the years, AP photojournalists have captured powerful images. A 9-year-old girl fleeing a napalm attack in 1972 during the Vietnam War. A Rwandan child too weak from malnutrition to hold his head up in Zaire. A 5-year-old girl holding the hand of an 89-year-old woman as they are evacuated from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Aid experts hope the image of Aylan Kurdi will be the tipping point for the Syrian war, and will inspire people to prod governments to help the country's suffering..


Guatemala swears in new president after Perez Molina resigns
GUATEMALA CITY (AP) - Guatemala's newly sworn-in president demanded that all top government officials submit their resignations and promised an honest and inclusive administration following the surprise resignation earlier Thursday of President Otto Perez Molina amid a widening fraud investigation. After President Alejandro Maldonado took office, a judge ordered Perez Molina held until Friday morning, when his corruption hearing was to reconvene. The former president was seen entering a military barracks where he will spend the night in custody.


Biden says he's not sure if he will seek presidency
ATLANTA (AP) - Vice President Joe Biden said Thursday he was unsure if he will seek the Democratic presidential nomination, telling a Jewish audience that his decision will hinge on whether he and his family have the "emotional energy to run." "Unless I can go to my party and the American people and say that I am able to devote my whole heart and my whole soul to this endeavor, it would not be appropriate," Biden said, responding to a question following a foreign policy address.


Prosecutor: Church shooting suspect to face death penalty
CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) - The white man accused of killing nine black churchgoers in what authorities said was a racially motivated crime during Bible study will face a death penalty trial, even though not all the victims' families agree with capital punishment, a prosecutor said Thursday. Solicitor Scarlett Wilson said Thursday that some crimes are just so heinous they require the most serious punishment the state can give.


Trump vows no third-party bid, will back GOP primary winner
NEW YORK (AP) - Caving to intense Republican lobbying, presidential candidate Donald Trump ruled out the prospect of a third-party White House bid on Thursday and vowed to support whoever wins the party's nomination - a U-turn made easier by his position at the front of the field. The decision follows weeks of behind-the-scenes efforts by GOP leaders, who've been trying to avert the possibility of an independent campaign by Trump ever since last month's opening debate, when he refused to promise to back the party's eventual nominee. A third-party bid by Trump, or any prominent conservative, could doom Republican efforts in 2016.


Manhunt could bring subdued holiday in recreation area
FOX LAKE, Ill. (AP) - The manhunt for three suspects wanted in the killing of an Illinois police officer threatened Thursday to dampen the Labor Day weekend across one of the state's most popular recreational areas, a boating and fishing playground known as the Chain O' Lakes. The region normally draws tens of thousands of visitors for end-of-summer fun, but concerns mounted that tourists might decide to go elsewhere because of the heavy police presence and fear that the fugitives could be hiding somewhere in the lush landscape of lakes, wetlands and forest glens.